GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2008

This term's information was last refreshed on 08 MAY 2015 15:46:03.

Courses taught by Gareth Doherty

05320: Architecture Expanded: New Positioning in Scale, Context and Agency (SES 0532000)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00   Gund - Gropius

Instructor(s)
Stephen Ramos, Gareth Doherty, Neyran Turan

Course Description

The course aims to examine the changing role of design within new scales of context emerging in contemporary urbanism. Designers are increasingly being compelled to address questions - related to infrastructure, ecology, and culture - which were previously confined to the domains of other disciplines. In an attempt to encourage designers and planners to reexamine their tools and develop strategies to better address those emerging phenomena, the course will explore new urban conditions and will formulate a framework for potential linkages between the social and the physical, the form and the context, and the very large and the very small. Over the past decade, discussions on urban landscape, infrastructure, and networks - with their clear and necessary replacement of postwar contextualisms and their emphasis on scale - saw design and infrastructure in a symbiotic relationship, resulting in design strategies of process, temporality and program as well as vertical/sectional dispositions (Koolhaas, Bigness) or topographical/operative urban surfaces (infrastructural/landscape urbanism). In rapidly urbanizing areas throughout the developing world, however, design decisions often precede infrastructure, wherein infrastructures may now result as an extension of design interventions. This condition not only signifies a shifting role of infrastructure in design but also underscores the expanded role of the designer within a much wider contextual scale, where ecological, regional, social, and political issues come to the fore. Rather than reacting to a predefined context, designers are now bound to redefine and shape their contexts. In an attempt to explore this proposition further, the seminar will concentrate on an alternative reading of the notions of infrastructure, ecology and context within architecture, landscape and urbanism. The general premise of the course is to focus on emerging circumstances (context) and multi-scalar design responses (form) to shape these conditions, including both the theoretical nexuses within the fields of landscape, planning, and design, as well as empirical cases within the developing world to help position and inform the discussion. The course will consider the extension and intensification of "circuits" that house, communicate or facilitate flows of goods, services and/or information to better understand how global logics and local dynamics interact to produce the contemporary urban form, as well as those new actors and strategies that shape new scalar conditions. In the context of the course, the issue of the "scalar" implies at least three dimensions: first, as design relates to expanded scales of infrastructure; second, as the potential set of issues implied by relations among multiple scales (architecture, landscape, ecology, planning); and third, as an act of scaling and re-positioning as it informs capacities to propose new design tools and strategies (models, techniques and practices). Thus, the urgency to reconsider the expanded agency of the designer is significant will be important for our discussions - the agency of design both as a form of capacity in relation to new techniques and strategies, and as a faculty of acting, power, and positioning. Rather than merely being fascinated by the big scale, larger contexts and their exaggerated depictions, the course aspires to open up discussions on how the design disciplines can reposition themselves and also reevaluate their techniques so that their projecting ability can have a more active and transformative impact on the forces that shape emergent urban conditions and form. Since the 1990s, architecture and urbanism risk being narrowly understood as simply the spatial manifestation of the widespread effects of globalization. As urban populations grew, cities intensified in their horizontal and vertical thickness with large-scale urban development projects, while they also bec


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09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Brian W. Blaesser, Marco Cenzatti, Preston Scott Cohen, Felipe Correa, Gareth Doherty, Stephen Ervin, Susan Fainstein, Richard T.T. Forman, Jose Gomez-Ibanez, K. Michael Hays, Sanford Kwinter, Anne McGhee, Michael Meredith, Farshid Moussavi, Richard Peiser, Spiro Pollalis, Peter Rowe, Allen Sayegh, Laura Solano, John Stilgoe, Kostas Terzidis, Matthew Urbanski, Bing Wang, Christian Werthmann, T. Kelly Wilson, Gary Hilderbrand

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of their advisor and of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


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09206: Social Spaces in the Academy II (ADV 0920601)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Thursday 11:30 - 2:00   Gund 505

Instructor(s)
Joan Busquets, Gareth Doherty, Jerold Kayden, Martin Zogran

Course Description

Building on initial results from a provost-funded research study conducted several years ago by the first offering of this research seminar, this second offering will update and deepen the examination of social spaces at academic institutions using Harvard University as the case study. Social spaces - indoor and outdoor public places where people engage in a variety of informal activities - permeate the academy. Social spaces include dining rooms, dormitory common rooms, classrooms, libraries, athletic facilities, performance halls, student centers, and other physical places. This research seminar focuses on a specially defined subset of social spaces: indoor and outdoor places open to and usable by students, faculty, and staff for informal activities such as meeting friends, people watching, eating a sandwich, or reading a book. Such social spaces may be intentionally designed, like the cafe at Lamont Library, or may arise spontaneously, like the area of intersecting pathways next to the boulders in front of the Science Center. The course will operate as a research study with faculty and students serving as members of the research team. Enrollment is limited to 20 students. The class will normally meet weekly for two hours. Much of the work will be conducted in the field, individually or in small teams of students and faculty. Researchers will investigate the interplay of social activities and physical settings through methods that include user interviews, activity mapping, videography, and spatial analysis of selected locations across the campus. Class discussions and work sessions will pull together the research study. Reading assignments will provide students with theoretical and methodological backgrounds and skills, as well as knowledge about other academic campuses, to conduct the research. Products will include proposals, plans, designs, and a webpage including a comprehensive relational database. The course counts as four units, and the workload is designed not to exceed what is expected of an average four-unit course.The Course is to meet weekly from 11:30am - 2:00pm on Thursdays; students will be required to conduct field research and/or meet with instructors for an additional 1.5hrs per week at times to be determined.


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