GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2008

This term's information was last refreshed on 08 MAY 2015 15:46:03.

Courses taught by Kostas Terzidis

02309: Kinetic Architecture (VIS 0230900)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Friday 2:00 - 5:00   Gund 508

Instructor(s)
Kostas Terzidis

Course Description

In architecture, the notion of motion is often represented as an abstract formal configuration that implies relationships of cause and effect. Deformation, juxtaposition, superimposition, absence, disturbance, and repetition, are just few of the techniques used by architects to express virtual motion and change. These approaches are based on the idea that perpetual succession is not only conceived directly through physical motion but also indirectly through formal expression.Physical motion, other than in doors, windows, elevators, or escalators, is not commonly present in buildings. In fact, the form and structure of the average building suggests stability, steadiness, sturdiness, and immobility. Yet, while motion may suggest agility, unpredictability, or uncertainty it may also suggest change, anticipation, and liveliness.Challenging past practices, architecture today finds itself in a position to revisit its traditional kinetic aesthetics with new technological innovations. Through the use of sensors, actuators, and micro-controllers, actual controlled motion can be designed, integrated, and implemented in, on, or across buildings. The traditional problematics of motion, stasis, and order are challenged, redefined, and transformed by new spatio-temporal possibilities and strategies opened up through technological innovation, particularly robotic technologies and new approaches to mobility, portability, and nomadic culture.This course will examine the notion of motion in architecture through virtual and physicalmethods. It will seek to investigate, explore, and propose how motion can be suggested, depicted, or physically incorporated in buildings or structures. The goal is to link past practices related to kinetic form with motion-based emerging technologies in a meaningful way and project into the inherent architectural possibilities.The area of kinetic architecture, i.e. the integration of motion into the built environment, and the impact such results has upon the aesthetics, design, and performance of buildings may be of great importance to the field of architecture. While the aesthetic value of virtual motion may always be a source of inspiration, its physical implementation in buildings and structures may challenge the very nature of what architecture really is.


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02311: Algorithmic Architecture (VIS 0231100)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00   Gund 111

Instructor(s)
Kostas Terzidis

Course Description

As architecture enters the new era of digital representation, geometrical theories and processes are being implemented, tested, and pushed to their limits. Recent theories of form in architecture have focused on computational methods of formal exploration and expression. From topological geometry and hypersurfaces to blobs and folds, there is a clear tendency to seek and explore formal properties as sources of ordering systems. For the last two decades, designers have been concerned with the use of computational mechanisms for the exploration of formal systems. These practices have attempted to readdress formal issues using new techniques and methods. Computational tools are central protagonists in this exploration.The dominant mode of utilizing computers in architecture today is that of computerization; entities or processes that are already conceptualized in the designer's mind are entered, manipulated, or stored on a computer system. In contrast, computation or computing, as a computer-based design tool, is generally limited. While research and development of software involves extensive computational techniques, mouse-based manipulations of 3D computer models are not necessarily acts of computation.Presently, an alternative choice is being formulated: algorithmic architecture. It involves the designation of software programs to generate space and form from the rule-based logic inherent in architectural programs, typologies, building code, and language itself. Instead of direct programming, the codification of design intention using scripting languages available in 3D packages (i.e. Maya Embedded Language MEL, 3DMaxScript, and FormZ 4.0) can build consistency, structure, coherency, traceability, and intelligence into computerized 3D form. By using scripting languages designers can go beyond the mouse, transcending the factory-set limitations of current 3D software.This course is aimed at investigating and exploring the structures, processes, and theories of computational design. The purpose is to develop algorithms and computational methods that would encapsulate the processes that lead to the generation of meaningful architectural form. Yet, the course does not intend to eliminate traditional 'manual' methods but rather to incorporate a synergy between both computational complexity and creative use of computers.


GSD iCommons Website


07330: Design Research Methods (PRO 0733000)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits
Tuesday 2:00 - 6:00   7 Sumner 104

Instructor(s)
Kostas Terzidis

Course Description

The purpose of this seminar is to guide doctoral students in the development and preparation of their research proposals. First, it will expose students to various philosophical theories related to their research areas. Second, it will introduce methodologies and strategies used in architectural research. Third, it will guide students in the development of a literature review and a thesis statement. Finally, it will discuss and critiques the proposed research with faculty advisors and student peers and suggest directions for refinement.The course will involve discussions, lectures, and presentations. Each student is expected to participate in the discussions, critically evaluate relevant theories and research methods, develop a strategic plan, and make a presentation. Out of these presentations and discussions, a detailed research plan for their thesis project should emerge.Instructional MethodologyStudents must complete all written and oral assignments to the instructor's satisfaction and actively participate in both the guest directed and student directed discussions in order to pass the seminar.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Brian W. Blaesser, Marco Cenzatti, Preston Scott Cohen, Felipe Correa, Gareth Doherty, Stephen Ervin, Susan Fainstein, Richard T.T. Forman, Jose Gomez-Ibanez, K. Michael Hays, Sanford Kwinter, Anne McGhee, Michael Meredith, Farshid Moussavi, Richard Peiser, Spiro Pollalis, Peter Rowe, Allen Sayegh, Laura Solano, John Stilgoe, Kostas Terzidis, Matthew Urbanski, Bing Wang, Christian Werthmann, T. Kelly Wilson, Gary Hilderbrand

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of their advisor and of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


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