GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2008

This term's information was last refreshed on 08 MAY 2015 15:46:03.

Courses taught by Erika Naginski

04201 [M1]: Buildings, Texts, and Contexts (HIS 0420100)

Architecture
Lecture - 2 credits
This course is a module. It lasts the first half of the semester only.
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund - Piper

Instructor(s)
K. Michael Hays, Erika Naginski

Course Description

The two-module sequence 4201-4202 will be taught as a single semester- long course for Fall 2008. This course is structured as a dialogue between historical and theoretical frameworks that affect our understanding of architecture and its genesis. The organizing principle here is syncretic as opposed to chronological, and synoptic rather than merely factual. We treat a selected range of concepts developed by philosophers, historians, and theorists to explain the production and experience of architecture. We move back and forth between projects from the early modern to the (almost) contemporary periods by means of one or several theoretical intertexts, which we use to open up a historical narrative across examples.We set the stage by means of the persistent dilemma of theoretical- historical thought, inaugurated here by concepts from Kant and Hegel: is art an autonomous form or is it determined by its historical context? We then turn to Classicism, its emergence as aesthetic doctrine during the Renaissance, its association with concepts of order and universality, its historiographic legacy, and its complex relation to Modernism. From there, we move to the interaction of ideology and representation; we discuss the symbolics of perspective, architectural metaphors of power in the Baroque period, and the discursive development and transformation of ideology in Althusser and Jameson. Deleuze is the major interlocutor in the next sections, which focus on the diagrammatic imagination, its philosophical roots in Leibniz, its use as a materialist social critique, and its implications for architectural design. Deleuze's elaboration of the diagram also serves as stepping stone first for a discussion of the Sublime in Enlightenment and Postmodernist contexts, and second for the key concepts of utopia, dystopia, and heterotopia, respectively. We conclude with the persistence of the Dialectic from Marx to Adorno to the present in order to address the production of space, the problem of abstraction, and the contemporary status of immanent critique.


GSD iCommons Website


04202 [M2]: Buildings, Texts, and Contexts (HIS 0420200)

Architecture
Lecture - 2 credits
This course is a module. It lasts the second half of the semester only.
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund - Piper

Instructor(s)
K. Michael Hays, Erika Naginski

Course Description

The two-module sequence 4201-4202 will be taught as a single semester- long course for Fall 2008. This course is structured as a dialogue between historical and theoretical frameworks that affect our understanding of architecture and its genesis. The organizing principle here is syncretic as opposed to chronological, and synoptic rather than merely factual. We treat a selected range of concepts developed by philosophers, historians, and theorists to explain the production and experience of architecture. We move back and forth between projects from the early modern to the (almost) contemporary periods by means of one or several theoretical intertexts, which we use to open up a historical narrative across examples.We set the stage by means of the persistent dilemma of theoretical- historical thought, inaugurated here by concepts from Kant and Hegel: is art an autonomous form or is it determined by its historical context? We then turn to Classicism, its emergence as aesthetic doctrine during the Renaissance, its association with concepts of order and universality, its historiographic legacy, and its complex relation to Modernism. From there, we move to the interaction of ideology and representation; we discuss the symbolics of perspective, architectural metaphors of power in the Baroque period, and the discursive development and transformation of ideology in Althusser and Jameson. Deleuze is the major interlocutor in the next sections, which focus on the diagrammatic imagination, its philosophical roots in Leibniz, its use as a materialist social critique, and its implications for architectural design. Deleuze's elaboration of the diagram also serves as stepping stone first for a discussion of the Sublime in Enlightenment and Postmodernist contexts, and second for the key concepts of utopia, dystopia, and heterotopia, respectively. We conclude with the persistence of the Dialectic from Marx to Adorno to the present in order to address the production of space, the problem of abstraction, and the contemporary status of immanent critique.


GSD iCommons Website


04420: The Ruin Aesthetic: Episodes in the History of an Architectural Idea (HIS 0442000)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Thursday 2:00 - 5:00   7 Sumner 104

Instructor(s)
Erika Naginski

Course Description

The Ruin Aesthetic: Episodes in the History of an Architectural Idea One of the most arresting images in Michel Serres's Rome: The Book of Foundations is the idea that history is "a knot of different times" -- a knot most visibly reified by the tangible traces of past civilizations. Serress knot speaks as readily to the stratigraphic realities of Roman urban space as to the composite aesthetics of eighteenth-century ruin pictures or Auguste Rodins Symbolist recasting of Medieval church portals. Artifacts, fragments, vestiges, rubble, debris, detritus,wreckage: all this has prompted a venerable body of writings and objects that work the metaphor of ruin into anything from template for the Sublime to mechanism for iconoclastic violence. We will begin by thinking about architecture and the vision of the past in the early modern period, considering a range of examples such as the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, Nicolas Poussin's Et in Arcadia Ego, and the plates of antiquarian treatises. We will then consider how the cult of the ruin has shaped notions of nostalgia and dystopia in modern contexts. Examples might include the Surrealist discovery of the broken column house at the Desert de Retz, Le Corbusier's apprehension of columns segments from the north facade of the Parthenon, Albert Speer's ruin theory of architecture, the Heideggerian concept of Ruinanz and the reflection of absence in the National September 11 Memorial. Writings by Arnaldo Momigliano, Alois Riegl, Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Manfredo Tafuri and Anthony Vidler among others will be crucial to address.


GSD iCommons Website


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