GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2010

This term's information was last refreshed on 08 MAY 2015 15:47:51.

Courses taught by K. Michael Hays

03436: Critical Preservation Practices (DES 0343600)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Monday 11:30 - 2:30   Gund 112

Instructor(s)
K. Michael Hays

Course Description

This seminar combines theoretical readings from the history of preservation and conservation in architecture with presentations of contemporary cases of architectural, landscape, and urban conservation from GSD faculty and outside experts. The course seeks to establish foundational knowledge for what will become an expanded GSD involvement in new preservation practices.


GSD iCommons Website


04201 [M1]: Buildings, Texts, and Contexts (HIS 0420100)

Architecture
Lecture - 2 credits
This course is a module. It lasts the first half of the semester only.
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund - Piper

Instructor(s)
K. Michael Hays, Erika Naginski

Course Description

The two-module sequence 4201-4202 will be taught as a single semester- long course for Fall 2010. This course is structured as a dialogue between historical and theoretical frameworks that affect our understanding of architecture and its genesis. The organizing principle here is syncretic as opposed to chronological, and synoptic rather than merely factual. We treat a selected range of concepts developed by philosophers, historians, and theorists to explain the production and experience of architecture. We move back and forth between projects from the early modern to the (almost) contemporary periods by means of one or several theoretical intertexts, which we use to open up a historical narrative across examples. We set the stage by means of the persistent dilemma of theoretical- historical thought, inaugurated here by concepts from Kant and Hegel: Is art an autonomous form or is it determined by its historical context? We then turn to Classicism, its emergence as aesthetic doctrine during the Renaissance, its association with concepts of order and universality, its historiographic legacy, and its complex relation to Modernism. From there, we move to the interaction of ideology and representation; we discuss the symbolics of perspective, architectural metaphors of power in the Baroque period, and the discursive development and transformation of ideology in Althusser and Jameson. Deleuze is the major interlocutor in the next sections, which focus on the diagrammatic imagination, its philosophical roots in Leibniz, its use as a materialist social critique, and its implications for architectural design. Deleuze's elaboration of the diagram also serves as a stepping stone first for a discussion of the Sublime in Enlightenment and Postmodernist contexts, and second for the key concepts of utopia, dystopia, and heterotopia, respectively. We conclude with the persistence of the Dialectic from Marx to Adorno to the present in order to address the production of space, the problem of abstraction, and the contemporary status of immanent critique.


GSD iCommons Website


04202 [M2]: Buildings, Texts, and Contexts (HIS 0420200)

Architecture
Lecture - 2 credits
This course is a module. It lasts the second half of the semester only.
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund - Piper

Instructor(s)
K. Michael Hays, Erika Naginski

Course Description

The two-module sequence 4201-4202 will be taught as a single semester- long course for Fall 2009. This course is structured as a dialogue between historical and theoretical frameworks that affect our understanding of architecture and its genesis. The organizing principle here is syncretic as opposed to chronological, and synoptic rather than merely factual. We treat a selected range of concepts developed by philosophers, historians, and theorists to explain the production and experience of architecture. We move back and forth between projects from the early modern to the (almost) contemporary periods by means of one or several theoretical intertexts, which we use to open up a historical narrative across examples. We set the stage by means of the persistent dilemma of theoretical- historical thought, inaugurated here by concepts from Kant and Hegel: Is art an autonomous form or is it determined by its historical context? We then turn to Classicism, its emergence as aesthetic doctrine during the Renaissance, its association with concepts of order and universality, its historiographic legacy, and its complex relation to Modernism. From there, we move to the interaction of ideology and representation; we discuss the symbolics of perspective, architectural metaphors of power in the Baroque period, and the discursive development and transformation of ideology in Althusser and Jameson. Deleuze is the major interlocutor in the next sections, which focus on the diagrammatic imagination, its philosophical roots in Leibniz, its use as a materialist social critique, and its implications for architectural design. Deleuze's elaboration of the diagram also serves as a stepping stone first for a discussion of the Sublime in Enlightenment and Postmodernist contexts, and second for the key concepts of utopia, dystopia, and heterotopia, respectively. We conclude with the persistence of the Dialectic from Marx to Adorno to the present in order to address the production of space, the problem of abstraction, and the contemporary status of immanent critique.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920101)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Eric Belsky, Felipe Correa, Peter Del Tredici, Jill Desimini, Richard T.T. Forman, David Hamilton, Jr., Andrea Hansen, K. Michael Hays, Christopher Hoxie, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Jonathan Levi, Judith Grant Long, Anne McGhee, Katharine Parsons, Christoph Reinhart, Michael Schroeder, Thomas Schroepfer, Mack Scogin, Rafael Segal, Jorge Silvetti, Maryann Thompson, Emily Waugh, Andrew Witt, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Cameron Wu, A. Hashim Sarkis, Christian Werthmann

Course Description

GSD iCommons Website


09304: Independent Thesis for the Degree Master in Design Studies (ADV 0930400)

Architecture
Research Seminar - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, Eric Belsky, K. Michael Hays, Timothy Hyde, Richard Jennings, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Sanford Kwinter, Christoph Reinhart, James Stockard, Charles Waldheim

Course Description

A student who selects this independent thesis for the degree Master in Design Studies pursues independent research of relevance to the selected course of study within the Master in Design Studies program, under the direction of a GSD faculty member. This option precludes taking any other independent study.


GSD iCommons Website


09504: Thesis in Satisfaction of the Degree Doctor of Design (ADV 0950400)

Architecture
Independent Study - 16 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, K. Michael Hays, Antoine Picon, Spiro Pollalis, Christoph Reinhart, Peter Rowe

Course Description

Under guidance of a faculty committee, the student conducts investigations and prepares a doctoral thesis.


GSD iCommons Website


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