GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2010

This term's information was last refreshed on 08 MAY 2015 15:47:51.

Courses taught by Paul Nakazawa

01301: RioStudio (STU 0130100)

Architecture
Option Studio - 8 credits - Limited enrollment
Tuesday Wednesday 2:00 - 6:00  

Instructor(s)
Bjarke Ingels, Paul Nakazawa

Course Description

The Graduate School of Design vs. Business School Studio aims to combine the creative experimentation of the designers with the rigorous number crunching of the economists to evolve practical ideas that are both socially, environmentally and economically profitable. Focusing on the problems and potentials of Rio de Janeiro the studio will aim at generating ideas for how the imminent investments for the 2014 World Cup and the subsequent 2016 Olympic Games can be placed to catalyze long term improvements for the the large local population rather than merely servicing the temporary needs of the global tourists and the world press. The world traditionally views public and private interests as opposites. The interests of the global capital and the local population are seen as mutually exclusive. However admirable and necessary philanthropy is, it will never be the long term answer to a big problem. It is a temporary relief or a short term fix, because it is dependent on injecting energy into a system without triggering a self propelling process. If we have an interest in social issues we need to design business models that improve the living conditions of the poor as a byproduct of a profitable process. We need to design eco systems - systems of both economy and ecology - that operate like urban perpetual motion engines - in dependant of charity but rather processes triggered by investment. With the global attention and massive investment for the two upcoming mega events fueled by the roaring Brazilian economy, Rio is at a strategic moment to seize the situation and envision a millennium upgrade of its urban infrastructure. What if we could come up with ideas where profitable real estate development and improved living conditions for the favellas might be two sides of the same coin. What if the temporary swell in hotel capacity for the games would trigger better living conditions in the long term.With the creation of Brasilia, Brazil has previously proven its capacity to pursue big ideas for order and progress. But rather than a tabula rasa where pure principles are projected on a clean canvas, we propose an evolutionary model that interprets and intervenes in the existing conditions of Rio's urban landscape to breed new hybrids between the interests of profit and the interest of the people. Bjarke Ingels will be at the GSD during the following times:August 31 - September 23October 7 - 27November 8 - 24December 6 - 16


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07408: A New Framework for Practice (PRO 0740800)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Monday 10:00 - 1:00   Gund 505

Instructor(s)
Paul Nakazawa

Course Description

The purpose of this course is: 1. to enable students to better understand the landscape of contemporary practice within a larger social, economic and political context; 2. to equip students with analytic frameworks and methods that will enable them to better navigate career directions and choices; 3. to exercise the ability to envision and critically assess potential trajectories for practice. Prior to the current global financial crisis, architects, landscape architects and urban planners practicing in the major economies of the world enjoyed an unprecedented quantity of work. The design professions were no different than most other business sectors in becoming complacent about the demand for their services and ever-expanding prospects. So much so that, with some notable exceptions, business and organizational models of even the most renowned design firms became skewed toward production at the expense of critical thinking about the fundamental purpose of their disciplines. The failure to grasp the real significance of our professions' purpose, ethics, opportunities, and unique competences became an abrogation of a larger responsibility to critically define and diligently exercise our professions rather than taking the path of least resistance by simply surrendering to forces of the market.Students will take on the task of investigating and documenting both existing and emergent frameworks of practice. Participants will develop specific narratives about practice and how they map into social/cultural, political and economic/business landscapes of different cities, regions and countries, as well as global critical infrastructure (including key technologies), and 'long waves' of change (e.g., demographics, climate, etc.). We will then use these narratives to critique existing generic models of practice in terms of their disciplinary underpinnings, practice and business strategies, organization and operations. The instructor will provide foundational concepts about contemporary practice as a starting point for the class, as well as coaching for the development of term projects. Course format: Lectures, class discussions and case study.Requirements: Consistent class attendance and participation; completion of class assignments; term project and final presentation (individual or small group).Students enrolled in this class are expected to be able to collaborate, conduct research, develop ideas critically, and integrate content from different disciplines. Prior work experience is preferred but not a pre-requisite.


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