GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2011

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:52:56.

Courses taught by Erika Naginski

04121: Buildings, Texts, and Contexts I: Classical and Baroque (folds of history and theory) (HIS 0412100)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund 111

Instructor(s)
K. Michael Hays, Erika Naginski

Course Description

This course is structured as a dialogue between the historical and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the formulation of architectural principles - what the architectural historian Rudolf Wittkower called the "apparatus of forms" - by means of selected case studies. The organizing principle here is thematic as opposed to chronological, and synoptic rather than merely factual. We treat a selected range of concepts developed by philosophers and historians to explain the Classical and the Baroque as dialectical systems of thought that arise in history but transcend this history to mark modern and postmodern practices.


GSD iCommons Website


04420: The Ruin Aesthetic: Episodes in the History of an Architectural Idea (HIS 0442000)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Thursday 3:00 - 6:00   Gund 318

Instructor(s)
Erika Naginski

Course Description

One of the arresting images in Michel Serres's Rome: The Book of Foundations is the idea that history is "a knot of different times" -- a knot rendered visible by the tangible traces of past civilizations. The knot of which Serres speaks applies as readily to the stratigraphic realities of Roman urban space as to the composite aesthetics of 18th-century ruin pictures or Auguste Rodin???s Symbolist recasting of Medieval church portals. Artifacts, fragments, vestiges, rubble, debris, detritus,wreckage: all this has prompted a venerable body of writings and objects that work the metaphor of ruin into anything from a template for the Sublime to a mechanism for iconoclastic violence. We will begin by thinking about architecture and the vision of the past in the early modern period, considering a range of examples from the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili to antiquarian treatises. We will then consider how the cult of the ruin has shaped nostalgia and dystopia in modern contexts. Examples might include the Surrealist discovery of the broken column house at the Desert de Retz, Le Corbusier's apprehension of columns segments from the north facade of the Parthenon, Albert Speer's ruin theory of architecture, the Heideggerian concept of Ruinanz and the reflection of absence in the National September 11 Memorial. Readings by Arnaldo Momigliano, Alois Riegl, Walter Benjamin, Michel Foucault, Manfredo Tafuri and Anthony Vidler among others.


GSD iCommons Website


09305: Master of Design Studies Final Project (ADV 0930500)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Neil Brenner, Giuliana Bruno, K. Michael Hays, Sanford Kwinter, Erika Naginski, Jeffrey Schnapp, Krzysztof Wodiczko

Course Description

The Final Project will consist of a theoretical/position component, and of a practical/experimental component. The scope of each of the two components will be determined according to the student's preference, and considering the specific character of the project in consultation with the area coordinator and the advisor. In exceptional cases the final project may be solely based on (expanded in scope and ambition) a theoretical component. A theoretical, written component is required for all final projects. The final project is equivalent to 8 units of courseworkTheoretical/Position component-A written document presenting the original contribution to, and original argument for your artistic/design/research project defended within the context of current discourses in relevant disciplinary fields. The theoretical argument must present the original methodology of the project and position it in relation to:-Relevant present day artistic and design practices and their specific methodologies-Relevant theoretical and critical discourses (including your elaborations on relevant "pro" and "contra" positions)-The relevant historical tradition Practical/Experimental componentThis component involves an original artistic/design project conceived, developed and presented as a public presentation, exhibition, installation, performance, action, and intervention in a physical or/and electronic space. The public presentation is a crucial part of the final project and is required. The Final Project's printed presentation as publishable document (that contains the theoretical argument and a graphic and textual presentation of the practical/experimental component)is also required.


GSD iCommons Website


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