GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2011

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:52:56.

Courses taught by Michael Hooper

05335: Participation in Planning and Development: Theory and Practice (SES 0533500)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Friday 2:00 - 5:00   20 Sumner 1C

Instructor(s)
Michael Hooper

Course Description

This course will meet for the first time in Portico 123 on Friday, September 2nd.
This seminar examines the theory and practice of participatory planning and governance, drawing on both developing and developed world experience. Recognizing that participation plays a major role in planning and design practice, the course seeks to provide students with a solid intellectual and professional foundation for work on participation-related issues. The seminar begins by looking at the history of participation and at different rationales for including the public in planning, design and policy making. Like the seminar more broadly, this investigation will examine participation in both urban planning and international development contexts. The bulk of the seminar then focuses on how participation plays out on the ground, examining the merits and challenges of public engagement in a wide variety of political, social and geographical settings. Major topics will include an investigation of the ways in which participation influences project outcomes. They will also include an examination of the nature and scale of spillovers from participation to other aspects of social and political life (for example, looking at the influence of participation on democratization, economic development and community empowerment). The seminar will explore the varieties of participation encountered in planning and development, from grassroots activism to mobilization by global movements. The seminar will also discuss the rise of civil society and debates surrounding this concept. Finally, the course will examine innovations in participatory planning and governance, with an eye towards novel modes of working with and including the public in planning, design and policy making. Particular attention will be given to the role of new technologies, institutional innovations and artistic practice in facilitating and shaping participation. The course will be run as a graduate seminar, with students expected to discuss weekly readings and engage in informed and critical class discussions. The seminar will be joined by practitioners working on participation issues.


GSD iCommons Website


09204: Preparation for Independent Thesis Proposal for MUP, MAUD, or MLAUD (ADV 0920400)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits
Monday 2:00 - 5:00   Gund 510

Instructor(s)
Michael Hooper

Course Description

This seminar is intended to provide the theoretical and methodological foundation for completing a graduate thesis in the department of Urban Planning and Design. By the end of the semester students will have produced a solid thesis proposal and have the necessary intellectual foundation to complete their thesis by the end of the academic year. Over the semester, students will identify and refine their thesis topic, solidify their relationship with a thesis advisor and produce a thesis proposal. Weekly sessions will involve discussions of relevant readings and exploration of emergent student work. As a forum for the exchange of work in progress, the seminar will allow students to share their ideas and get feedback on the development of their thesis from their peers, visiting critics and reviewers, and faculty. The seminar will begin by introducing the thesis as a conceptual frame and by identifying the key elements that cut across the different types of theses that might be produced by students, whether textual, design-focused or based in some other medium, such as film. It will then address the following issues, among others: topic and question identification, research methods, case selection, the craft of thesis production, managing the student-advisor relationship and techniques for verbally defending a thesis. Students will complete weekly assignments relevant to their thesis and present in class on most weeks. Since the seminar will be run as a graduate seminar, students will be expected to provide critical and thoughtful responses to their peers' work and engage in informed and mature discussion of the issues found in the readings. The course will include a mid-term and final review of students' proposals, to be attended by faculty and critics.


GSD iCommons Website


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