GSD Course Bulletin - Spring 2012

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:53:34.

Courses taught by Mark Mulligan

02414: Preservation Media Project: The Hatch Cottage (VIS 0241400)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Monday 2:00 - 5:00   Gund 318

Instructor(s)
Christopher Hoxie, Mark Mulligan

Course Description

In 1960 John Hall, a self-taught architect, designed and built a modest yet innovative summer cottage for Robert Hatch, a magazine editor, and his wife Ruth, a painter. Sited on Cape Cod’s eastern shore, atop sand dunes overlooking Cape Cod bay, the lightweight wooden structure was conceived as an abstract composition of open and closed cubical volumes framing the landscape – one of several highly original works of modern architecture built by the Cape’s thriving community of European and American artists at the time. After the demise of its owners, the Hatch Cottage fell into disrepair and was slated for demolition by the National Park Service, which owns and manages the land. Despite its value as a prime example of midcentury New England modernism – as argued by its primary advocate, the Cape Cod Modern House Trust – the cottage still faces tremendous challenges being recognized as a candidate for historic preservation. 
This seminar-workshop uses the case of the Hatch Cottage as a vehicle for considering contemporary issues in the conservation of modern architecture related to cultural meaning, construction method, and representational media. Students are asked to consider not only why and how to preserve a work of architecture whose very construction methods have compromised its longevity – but also what the core focus of preservation efforts should be: preserving use? outward appearance? original construction materials? relationship to surroundings? something else? Working in teams, students will develop and test a number of alternative preservation scenarios based on political strategizing, creative programming and financing, adaptive construction, site design, and so on.  
The workshop component of the course stresses critical exploration of advanced digital media – building students’ fluency in modeling, rendering, and animating – to investigate alternative preservation scenarios and communicate these to a hypothetical (or real) public. We will pay close attention to the role that form, light, atmosphere, and photographic technique might play, for example, in representing past, present, and future conditions of the Hatch Cottage. Following a series of preliminary exercises, the main focus of students’ work will be on the production of an animated video as a group project, representing the strongest and best ideas of our explorations over the semester. 
Enrollment is limited to fourteen students. The class meets weekly on Mondays. Class sessions are divided between lectures, discussions, demonstrations and workshops, and working sessions focused on the team project(s). A field trip to tour the Hatch Cottage and other modern era beaches houses on Cape Cod is planned for early February, with possible follow-up visits later in the term. Peter McMahon, Executive Director of the Cape Cod Modern House Trust, will join us as advisor and critic at points during the semester, including a final review during exam week.
 
 


GSD iCommons Website


06311: Innovative Construction in Japan (SCI 0631100)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Friday 9:00 - 12:00   Gund 318

Instructor(s)
Mark Mulligan

Course Description


Modern Japanese architecture has been much admired in the West for its attention to materials, its refined construction details, and its ability to integrate traditional design principles into works that simultaneously push the forefront of technology.  This lecture course looks in depth at significant works by modern Japanese architects, particularly those of the last quarter-century, analyzing both their detailed construction and the larger historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts in which they are produced.  Individual buildings will thus serve as vehicles for exploring the relationship between design theories and construction technique.

Students will be offered two options for coursework: they may work in groups to develop two case studies of their own choosing, related to the production of analytical computer models; or they may propose independent research papers, to be developed iteratively in drafts over the course of the semester.  The course meets weekly on Fridays and is open to all students who have completed the following prerequisite courses (or their equivalents): GSD-6125 and GSD-6229.
 


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Iñaki Abalos, Pierre Bélanger, Eve Blau, Neil Brenner, Joan Busquets, Felipe Correa, Daniel D'Oca, Gareth Doherty, Andreas Georgoulias, Jose Gomez-Ibanez, Andrea Hansen, K. Michael Hays, Michael Hooper, Eric Howeler, Timothy Hyde, Niall Kirkwood, Sanford Kwinter, David Mah, Panagiotis Michalatos, Mark Mulligan, Ciro Najle, Ken Tadashi Oshima, Richard Peiser, Chris Reed, Ingeborg Rocker, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Allen Sayegh, Jeffrey Schnapp, James Stockard, Maryann Thompson, Charles Waldheim, Bing Wang, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Peter Del Tredici, Martin Bechthold

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of their advisor and of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


Return to FACULTY list · Return to COURSE LISTING