GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2012

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:54:06.

Courses taught by Peter Rowe

04329: Urbanization in the East Asian Region (HIS 0432900)

Urban Planning and Design
Lecture - 4 credits
Monday 2:00 - 5:00   Gund 517

Instructor(s)
Peter Rowe

Course Description

The purpose of this lecture course is to provide an overall account of urbanization in selected cities within the rapidly developing East Asian region from early beginnings; to characterize relevant political traditions and forms of planning administration and city management affecting urbanization there; and to depict prevalent patterns of settlement, including illustration at appropriate levels. Generally, discussion will move from a macro level, including overall city plans, to the meso scale of specific districts and the micro level of particular building configurations and types. The questions being addressed are whether there is a distinctive form of urbanization with East Asia, or whether it is largely a matter of satisfying demands within the ambit of internationally available building and infrastructural technologies? Are there common problems and opportunities accompanying urban development in the region, or is each place sufficiently different so as to defy unitary characterization? The cities in question are Singapore, Hong Kong, Taipei, Tokyo, Seoul, Shanghai, Beijing, Suzhou, Wenzhou, and Wuhan. Presentation will also cover urban formation in national settings, like China and South Korea, as well as questions of sustainability, again particularly in the Chinese context.

 
Student participation will be by way of follow-up seminar discussions and two short papers: a case study and a topical presentation and discussion.
 


GSD iCommons Website


05433: Modern Housing and Urban Districts: Concepts, Cases and Comparisons (SES 0543300)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Monday 10:00 - 1:00   Gund 318

Instructor(s)
Peter Rowe

Course Description

This seminar course will deal with ‘modern housing’ covering a period primarily from 1990 to the present. It will engage with ‘urban districts’ in so far as housing projects under discussion contribute to the making of these districts, or are shaped by the districts in which they are placed. Examples will also be drawn from different cultural contexts with emphasis on Europe, North America and East Asia, although also including examples from Latin America, North Africa and the Middle East. The course will begin with discussion of several broad topics germane to design issues in contemporary housing, including ideas of community and what constitutes a dwelling community from various cultural perspectives; territories and types dealing with underlying urban conditions that play host to contemporary housing; interior and other landscapes that chart the diversity of contemporary living circumstances, as well as notions of flexibility, specialization and polyfunctionality; and expressive and representational issues particularly concerning place specific and inherently situated aspects of existence alongside of dynamic, perennially future-oriented dimensions of living. This broad topical discussion will be followed by case studies, roughly pairing underlying urban conditions and characteristics with architectural projects. Within each case study theme particular contemporary examples will provide the primary focus, although others will be introduced to flesh out necessary historical circumstances and lineages of housing development. These topics will include: urban block shapers, tall towers, housing in urban landscapes, superblock configurations, big buildings and submultiples, infrastructural engagements, infill interventions, indigenous reinterpretations, and the housing of special populations. Concluding discussion will examine various dimensions across projects and urban conditions in part to identify strengths and weaknesses but also to set contemporary housing aside from that of modern housing in prior eras. Student participation will be by way of attendance, discussion and especially case study presentation and documentation.
 


GSD iCommons Website


09504: Thesis in Satisfaction of the Degree Doctor of Design (ADV 0950400)

Architecture
Independent Study - 16 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, Jose Gomez-Ibanez, Spiro Pollalis, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Charles Waldheim

Course Description

Under guidance of a faculty committee, the student conducts investigations and prepares a doctoral thesis.


GSD iCommons Website


09506: Thesis Extension in Satisfaction of Degree Doctor of Design (ADV 0950600)

Landscape Architecture
Independent Study - 16 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, K. Michael Hays, Jerold Kayden, Antoine Picon, Spiro Pollalis, Christoph Reinhart, Peter Rowe

Course Description

Under guidance of a faculty committee, the student conducts investigations and prepares a doctoral thesis.


GSD iCommons Website


09691: Doctoral Program Proseminar (ADV 0969100)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits
Wednesday 2:30 - 5:30   40 Kirkland 1D

Instructor(s)
Peter Rowe

Course Description

This pro-seminar is one way of fulfilling a requirement for successful completion of the Doctor of Design program. Primarily, it will focus on various thematic areas that range across individual study topics and the methods and skills that might be involved in each area, These will include introduction to: geographic information and methods of spatial analysis, quantitative and related methods of statistical analysis, critical theory and hermeneutic analysis, and ethnographic and qualitative methods in social settings. In addition, various perspectives on aspects of constructed environments will be presented and discussed. These will cover: historical thinking, thinking about technologies, theorizing landscapes, and theorizing urban form. The ubiquitous task of documentation will also be taken up. Each seminar will be of two hours duration and comprised of an introductory or thematic presentation, largely by a guest speaker, including follow-up questions. This will be followed by summary presentations by students of selected readings on each theme, followed by further discussion. Other class assignments will include rendering of a literature review of students’ research topics, as well as a short topical presentation.
 


GSD iCommons Website


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