GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2012

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:54:06.

Courses taught by Kelly Doran

01211: Landscape Architecture III: Third Semester Core Studio (STU 0121100)

Landscape Architecture
Core Studio - 8 credits
Tuesday Thursday 12:30 - 6:00  

Instructor(s)
Pierre Bélanger, Niall Kirkwood, Luis Rodrigo Callejas Mujica, Kelly Doran, Rosetta Elkin, Juan Rois, Philippe Coignet, Robert Pietrusko

Course Description

Addressing the inertia of urban planning and the overexertion of civil engineering in the 20th century, this course focuses on the design of large, complex, contaminated brownfield sites with a regional, ecological and infrastructural outlook. Employing the agency of regional ecology and landscape infrastructure as the dominant drivers of design, the studio involves the development of biodynamic and biophysical systems that provide flexible yet directive patterns for future urbanization. Through a series of contemporary mapping methods, field measures, case studies, readings and design investigations, the course results in a series of collaborative exercises leading to a large scale design project and future scenarios. Drawing from canonical case studies on regional reclamation strategies from across the world, the studio is further enhanced by a robust, regional representation program. Focusing on the metrics of geospatial representation and remote sensing, two intensive workshops throughout the term of the studio didactically deal with the interrelated subjects of regional cartography and site topography as operative and telescopic instruments of design across scales. Contributing to a complex, multi-layered profiling of the site as ‘system’ and the reformulation of program as ‘process’, the studio establishes a base platform for engaging an array of complex issues related to site contamination, biophysical systems, regional ecology, land cover, urban infrastructure and economic geography. Precluding conventional forms of urban development such as housing or retail development, the penultimate objective of the course is to explore and articulate the potential effectiveness of broader and longer range strategies where biophysical systems prefigure as the denominator for re-envisioning public infrastructures and regional urban economies in the future.
 


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09124: Colonizing Last Frontiers: Energy Landscapes in the Chilean Patagonia (ADV 0912400)

Landscape Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Tuesday 8:30 - 11:30   20 Sumner 1C

Instructor(s)
Anita Berrizbeitia, Kelly Doran

Course Description

 This seminar will investigate the material and ecological processes related to the development of the Proyecto Hidroaysén (PHA) in the Chilean Patagonia. The PHA, a series of five hydro-electric dams and their associated infrastructure, is to be constructed along the Baker and the Pascua Rivers to supply a quarter of Chile’s future energy needs. The purpose of this seminar is to explore the economic, environmental and social impacts of hydro-electric generation. Rather than assume the position of environmental groups (not to build), or the government’s (it is a necessary infrastructure), we will instead focus our investigations on the transformative potentials of the PHA’s ecological, material and geographical byproducts.

 
Our working hypotheses will be that the operations associated with the development of an energy corridor can be engaged productively. Flooding, de/re forestation, quarrying, landfilling and the construction of dams, roads, power lines, and temporary workers camps, raise questions of landscape, infrastructure, ecology, habitat, economy, recreation, and settlement. More specifically, the seminar will focus on typologies of interface, and it will be organized thematically and around issues specific to hydroelectric generation. Examples of the topics that will be explored in the seminar are: the interface between land and water, specifically the various types of water of the rivers of the region (still, meander, rapid, cascade, etc.) and the many types of deposition associated with them (meanders, terracing, islands, etc.); the interface between forest and cleared corridor, the interface between productive and recreational programs; the potential synergies between extractive (mining), fill (landfill) and other topographical operations and programs; and temporary workers settlements and village expansions. The foundational character of the PHA implies that any strategy implemented for the materialization of the project will also acquire a structuring force in the (inevitable) colonization of the area.
 


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