GSD Course Bulletin - Spring 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:54:38.

Courses taught by Kiel Moe

06430: Forms of Energy: Maximum Power Design (SCI 0643000)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Wednesday 10:00 - 1:00   Gund 505

Instructor(s)
Kiel Moe

Course Description

Few words can transform the formation and functions of architecture in this century more than a deep and pervasive recognition that matter is but an expression of captured energy. Material practices are actually but a subset of energy practices. This seminar tables the theories, techniques and technologies of an architectural agenda for energy. In the 2013 Forms of Energy seminar, we will focus on maximum power formations of emergy in various building systems and forms. It is essential today to grasp the formations of energy inherent in building systems: their hierarchy of emergy. The second, more important, task is to discern the potential feedbacks of those systems and their emergy. These feedbacks will operate at multiple scales: from physiological responses, to microclimatic effects, to labor, and to global carbon cycles. The seminar discussion and project work will aim to maximize the power of architecture by aiming to maximize its feedbacks: from body, to building, to city, to region, and to planet. The focus is how architecture can best capture and channel multiple forms of energy towards the most architecturally and ecologically exuberant ends. To this end, the seminar is equally technical and formal in its ambitions. A primary design research project will document the emergy formation and capacities of a basic architectural system: wood, concrete, or masonry. There is a large range of possibilities within this relatively limited set of materials: we don’t know what wood, for instance, can really even do. The seminar advances knowledge of basic thermodynamic, physiological and ecological systems theories through readings, discussion, and research.
 


GSD iCommons Website


06438: What is energy and how (else) might we think about it? (SCI 0643800)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Wednesday 2:00 - 5:00   42 Kirkland 1G

Instructor(s)
Kiel Moe, Sanford Kwinter

Course Description

Designers today require radically different intellectual frameworks within which to think energy, environment, and ecology. The need to rethink applies not only to the positivist and one-dimensional approaches that characterize common institutional initiatives, but to the widespread assumptions—often anachronistic or outright wrong—about what physics and biology actually teach us about environments. These assumptions are in turn widely embedded in many philosophical, theoretical, cultural and even moral propositions and have lead to an essential doldrums in thought and imagination regarding the role of energy and its relation to more general questions of form and formation.

Among the central episodes in knowledge that have remained inexplicably external to contemporary accounts of sustainability are the postwar developments in thermodynamics, particularly the revised understandings of equilibrium theory, control theory, and universal energy laws. The thermodynamic and cybernetic impetus of energy/ecological systems has not yet begun to impact design culture in any systematic way. The current century’s imperatives are already demanding significantly greater ambition and rigor than those inherited from the 20th century antecedents that tacitly constitute the basis, and limited horizon, of the contemporary shortfalls in speculative practice and theory about the role of energy in design.

This course seeks to provide a certain foundation and acquaintance with these broader and more powerful theories of the structure and dynamics of the ecosphere (the cybernetic/thermodynamic cosmos) with a view to providing in turn a new ethos of speculation within design practice and discourse that the customary bureaucratic and quantitative approaches do not encompass or address. This course is principally directed toward problems within the culture of design, directed towards alternate agendas for energetic, environmental and ecological thinking. The principles in this course are equally applicable to architectural, landscape, and urban practices. In addition to lectures by the resident instructors there will be a series of up to 8 sustained and substantial engagements with a series of visitors—emerging voices who have claimed a stake in the outcome of the field.
 


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Masters Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Silvia Benedito, Eve Blau, Neil Brenner, Joan Busquets, Felipe Correa, Diane Davis, Peter Del Tredici, Jill Desimini, Sonja Duempelmann, Ann Forsyth, Chuck Hoberman, Michael Hooper, Eric Howeler, Christopher Hoxie, Florian Idenburg, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Remment Koolhaas, Mark Laird, Christopher Lee, Jonathan Levi, Rahul Mehrotra, Kiel Moe, Ciro Najle, Erkin Ozay, Richard Peiser, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Deidre Schmidt, Jorge Silvetti, James Stockard, Bing Wang, Jay Wickersham, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Martin Bechthold, Jana Cephas, Mark Mulligan, Robert Pietrusko, K. Michael Hays, Rachel Vroman

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


09301: Independent Thesis in Satisfaction of Degree MArch (ADV 0930100)

Architecture
Research Seminar - 12 credits

Instructor(s)
Leire Asensio Villoria, Martin Bechthold, Felipe Correa, Chuck Hoberman, John Hong, Eric Howeler, Mariana Ibanez, Florian Idenburg, Kiel Moe, Toshiko Mori, Mark Mulligan, Jinhee Park, Ingeborg Rocker, Peter Rowe, Jorge Silvetti, Maryann Thompson, Elizabeth Whittaker, Cameron Wu, Preston Scott Cohen, Mack Scogin

Course Description

Following preparation in GSD 9203, each student conducts a design exploration that tests and expands the thesis.Prerequisites: GSD 9203


GSD iCommons Website


09302: Independent Thesis in Satisfaction of the Degree MAUD, MLAUD, or MUP (ADV 0930200)

Urban Planning and Design
Research Seminar - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Pierre Bélanger, Eve Blau, Joan Busquets, Felipe Correa, Diane Davis, Jose Gomez-Ibanez, Eric Howeler, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Alex Krieger, Kiel Moe, John Nastasi, A. Hashim Sarkis, Jorge Silvetti, James Stockard, Michael Hooper

Course Description

Following preparation in GSD 9204, each student pursues a topic of relevance to urban design or urban planning, which may include design or planning exploration, academic inquiry, or a combination thereof.


GSD iCommons Website


09304: Independent Thesis for the Degree Master in Design Studies (ADV 0930400)

Architecture
Research Seminar - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Neil Brenner, Jana Cephas, Diane Davis, Gareth Doherty, Richard T.T. Forman, K. Michael Hays, Michael Hooper, Timothy Hyde, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Sanford Kwinter, Miho Mazereeuw, Panagiotis Michalatos, Kiel Moe, Christoph Reinhart, Holly Samuelson, Andrew Witt, Allen Sayegh

Course Description

A student who selects this independent thesis for the degree Master in Design Studies pursues independent research of relevance to the selected course of study within the Master in Design Studies program, under the direction of a GSD faculty member. This option precludes taking any other independent study.


GSD iCommons Website


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