GSD Course Bulletin - Spring 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:54:38.

Courses taught by Diane Davis

01509: The Flexible Leviathan: Reconsidering Scale and Fixity in the Contemporary Metropolis (STU 0150900)

Urban Planning and Design
Option Studio - 8 credits - Limited enrollment
Tuesday Wednesday 2:00 - 6:00  

Instructor(s)
Diane Davis, Jose Castillo

Course Description

Mexico City is one of the most dynamic and complex metropolitan areas in the world today. With over 20.1 million inhabitants, remarkable urban growth, an active, yet dual economy and a palimpsest of material histories centuries-old, it is quite a case study for architecture and urban planning today. Iztapalapa, in the southeast part of the metropolitan area is the most populated ‘delegación’ (borough) in Mexico City with over 1.8 million inhabitants. It also is one of the poorest, most underserviced, crime-ridden and stigmatized areas in the city. Despite all that, it is a location with a strong cultural voice, an active youth population, and demographic diversity. Within Iztapalapa, the Centro Oriente (East Center) site comprises close to 40 hectares in size and is one of the largest open territories within the urban area of Mexico City. As a terrain surrounded by large-scale infrastructures, formal and informal housing, squatter settlements, complex geological and hydrological issues as well as massive housing estates, Centro Oriente offers a possibility to reimagine urban planning as a tool of socio-spatial transformation.

This studio seeks to produce a vision for Centro Oriente, both in the local context of Iztapalapa and in metropolitan terms, thus theorizing the meaning of sustainable urbanism in large cities while also engaging the real world, local context of urban policy-making through urban planning and design intervention. The course is informed by two driving questions:


 
The guiding hypothesis is that by reframing the issues of scale and temporality we can create a different urbanity, one that is better able to address the social, economic, ecological and programmatic imperatives of the contemporary metropolis.

The local government of Iztapalapa is the studio sponsor.

Course Structure and Deliverables:
There is one class trip to Mexico City planned for February 9-16th. Professors Davis and Castillo will guide students through classroom lecturing and other forms of grounded knowledge-production about the politics and financing of urban interventions in Mexico as well as the socio-economic and built environmental history of Iztapalapa and Mexico City. Students will learn about the regimes of planning in the city, as well as the forces facilitating and/or harnessing urban transformation at a variety of scales. Exercises include:


Students will be evaluated on the basis of two final deliverables:

 
 
 
 


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Masters Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Silvia Benedito, Eve Blau, Neil Brenner, Joan Busquets, Felipe Correa, Diane Davis, Peter Del Tredici, Jill Desimini, Sonja Duempelmann, Ann Forsyth, Chuck Hoberman, Michael Hooper, Eric Howeler, Christopher Hoxie, Florian Idenburg, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Remment Koolhaas, Mark Laird, Christopher Lee, Jonathan Levi, Rahul Mehrotra, Kiel Moe, Ciro Najle, Erkin Ozay, Richard Peiser, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Deidre Schmidt, Jorge Silvetti, James Stockard, Bing Wang, Jay Wickersham, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Martin Bechthold, Jana Cephas, Mark Mulligan, Robert Pietrusko, K. Michael Hays, Rachel Vroman

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


09302: Independent Thesis in Satisfaction of the Degree MAUD, MLAUD, or MUP (ADV 0930200)

Urban Planning and Design
Research Seminar - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Pierre Bélanger, Eve Blau, Joan Busquets, Felipe Correa, Diane Davis, Jose Gomez-Ibanez, Eric Howeler, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Alex Krieger, Kiel Moe, John Nastasi, A. Hashim Sarkis, Jorge Silvetti, James Stockard, Michael Hooper

Course Description

Following preparation in GSD 9204, each student pursues a topic of relevance to urban design or urban planning, which may include design or planning exploration, academic inquiry, or a combination thereof.


GSD iCommons Website


09304: Independent Thesis for the Degree Master in Design Studies (ADV 0930400)

Architecture
Research Seminar - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Neil Brenner, Jana Cephas, Diane Davis, Gareth Doherty, Richard T.T. Forman, K. Michael Hays, Michael Hooper, Timothy Hyde, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Sanford Kwinter, Miho Mazereeuw, Panagiotis Michalatos, Kiel Moe, Christoph Reinhart, Holly Samuelson, Andrew Witt, Allen Sayegh

Course Description

A student who selects this independent thesis for the degree Master in Design Studies pursues independent research of relevance to the selected course of study within the Master in Design Studies program, under the direction of a GSD faculty member. This option precludes taking any other independent study.


GSD iCommons Website


09305: Master of Design Studies Final Project (ADV 0930500)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Diane Davis, Michael Hooper, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Sanford Kwinter, Jesse Shapins, Krzysztof Wodiczko

Course Description

The Final Project will consist of a theoretical/position component, and of a practical/experimental component. The scope of each of the two components will be determined according to the student's preference, and considering the specific character of the project in consultation with the area coordinator and the advisor. In exceptional cases the final project may be solely based on (expanded in scope and ambition) a theoretical component. A theoretical, written component is required for all final projects. The final project is equivalent to 8 units of coursework.

Theoretical/Position component

A written document presenting the original contribution to, and original argument for your artistic/design/research project defended within the context of current discourses in relevant disciplinary fields.

The theoretical argument must present the original methodology of the project and position it in relation to:

Practical/Experimental component

This component involves an original artistic/design project conceived, developed and presented as a public presentation, exhibition, installation, performance, action, and intervention in a physical or/and electronic space. The public presentation is a crucial part of the final project and is required. The Final Project's printed presentation as publishable document (that contains the theoretical argument and a graphic and textual presentation of the practical/experimental component)is also required.


GSD iCommons Website


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