GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:09.

Courses taught by Christine Smith

04362: Structuring Urban Experience: From the Athenian Acropolis to the Boston Common (HIS 0436200)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Tuesday Thursday 11:30 - 1:00   Gund - Gropius

Instructor(s)
Christine Smith

Course Description

This lecture course examines selected cities between the fifth century B.C. and the seventeenth century A.D., beginning with ancient Athens and ending with proposals for rebuilding London after the great fire in 1666. It is not, however, a survey. Rather, each of the lectures takes up one city at one golden moment of its development to exemplify a theme or themes. The course, therefore, is both chronologically and thematically structured.

The first half of the semester treats the ancient and late antique city, beginning with Athens and continuing with Alexandria, Rome, Constantinople and Antioch. This section concludes with a consideration of the effects of Christianization on urban form, the widespread decline of urban habitation in the early Middle Ages, and the rising importance of ideal or symbolic “cities of the mind.” The second half of the semester looks at selected instances of Renaissance and Baroque urban interventions, beginning with Florence, returning again to Rome, and then moving to Venice, Madrid, Paris and London. The last lecture, which will be on Boston from its founding in 1630 up to the Revolution, gives us the opportunity to reflect on to what extent new cities do or do not reflect historical patterns of settlement.

Each week is devoted to one city. In the first meeting I will give a lecture that covers urban layout and topography, infrastructure, patterns and types of housing, and typologies of the major monuments. I will also cover in more depth those features relating to the themes for the week - the relation of the city to countryside, for instance, or the city as center of cultural activity, the city and ideas about space, and so on. In the second meeting, students will report on assigned readings that deepen or amplify the themes for the week and the rest of the session will be given over to discussion.

Students are required to present assigned readings in class and to serve as facilitators of the discussions on a rotating basis. Each student will submit a final research paper of twelve pages (text) on a city of their choice.


GSD iCommons Website


04437: Imagine Michelangelo (HIS 0443700)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Wednesday 11:30 - 2:30   40 Kirkland 1D

Instructor(s)
Christine Smith

Course Description

The use of digital models as instruments of historical research. Almost all of Michelangelo’s architectural projects are unbuilt, unfinished, or have been significantly altered by later additions and changes which obscure the architect’s original vision for them. In this seminar, students create digital “site” models of these projects, or parts of them, as they exist or are known to have been planned. They then develop the models using historical sources such as drawings and texts to explore how the existing work differs from Michelangelo’s intentions. Renderings are made that recreate the original form, color, texture and light intended by the architect. This imaginative recreation makes possible a deeper and more accurate assessment of Michelangelo’s own ideas for the work. On the basis of that knowledge, students then contextualize the project within Michelangelo’s design philosophy and its architectural context.

The first six weeks of the seminar are taken up by lectures on Michelangelo’s architecture. During this time students choose a problem, research it, and prepare the “site” model. The second half of the semester is given to presentation and discussion of the individual projects. The final product, submitted at the end of the course, will be a series of renderings of the chosen “site” together with a written narrative of the research findings.

The course is primarily intended for students who have the skills to make complex models and finished renderings. No instruction on digital representation will be provided. However, students who wish to take the course and who do not have these skills may choose, instead, to explore a problem through traditional means and submit a written term paper on their topic.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Iñaki Abalos, Frank Apeseche, Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Joan Busquets, Jana Cephas, Ed Eigen, Rosetta Elkin, Andreas Georgoulias, Michael Hooper, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Alex Krieger, Judith Grant Long, Yanni Loukissas, David Mah, Rahul Mehrotra, Panagiotis Michalatos, Toshiko Mori, Mark Mulligan, Erika Naginski, Antoine Picon, Peter Rowe, Holly Samuelson, Allen Sayegh, Jorge Silvetti, Christine Smith, Maryann Thompson, Raymond Torto, Charles Waldheim, Bing Wang, Andrew Witt, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Cameron Wu, Diane Davis, Eric Howeler, Neil Brenner

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


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