GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:09.

Courses taught by James Stockard

05326: Housing and Urbanization in the United States (SES 0532600)

Urban Planning and Design
Lecture - 4 credits
Monday 1:00 - 4:00   Gund 124

Instructor(s)
James Stockard, Eric Belsky

Course Description

This course examines housing as an object of policy and planning as it relates to urban form and issues of social concern. It is intended to provide those with an interest in urban policy and planning with a broad background on why housing matters and how its unique attributes a) give rise to certain policy and planning challenges and b) should shape how practitioners respond to these challenges.
 
After laying out a conceptual framework for understanding the unique role housing plays in the constitution of urban areas and its implications for public policy and urban planning, the course provides an overview of critical topics in housing and US urbanism. These include: the role of homes as co-constitutive of the private and domestic realms; housing as a commodity; housing as an icon and encoder of social status; housing as constitutive of “neighborhoods” and how it influences resident outcomes; participatory planning for community development; capital formation and housing investment; theories of housing and urban spatial form; the suburbs and their discontents; exclusionary and inclusionary zoning; development exactions; provision of municipal services, public economics, and residential choice; trends in and theories of residential segregation; theories and responses to the concentration of urban poverty; community development and housing’s role in it; affordable housing policy, planning, and development; transit-oriented development and mixed income housing; housing investment for transformation of distressed communities; low-income homeownership and its spatial aspects; addressing communities hardest hit by foreclosures; sustainable infill development, master-planned development, and regional governance and planning.
 
Upon completions, students will have a firm grasp of housing and urban issues, a theoretical frame for understanding them, and a working knowledge of the planning and policy tools used to address these issues. The course will involve lectures and discussions. Students will be graded based on course participation and the completion of written assignments.
 


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05476: Housing Delivery Systems in the United States (SES 0547600)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Wednesday 1:00 - 4:00   Gund 124

Instructor(s)
James Stockard

Course Description

This is a basic course to introduce students to the American system for producing housing. We look at seven “actors”—consumers, developers, lenders, infrastructure providers, regulators, subsidy providers and intermediaries—and consider their interactions that produce the housing we get in this country. The first part of the course is spent in exploring the nature of each of these actors and their prominent entities, motivations, limitations and relations with the other elements of the system. We will pay particular attention to the three types of developers that drive the American system—for profit, non profit and public—examining their role in housing production in some depth. In the second half of the course, we will look at a number of related issues, including alternate delivery systems used in other parts of the world, current issues in the American approach to housing, the links between housing and other critical urban systems (transportation, education, energy, public health, infrastructure) and proposed innovations in our approach to housing production. We will have a number of guests in the class from Boston’s very active housing network. The goal of the class is that students gain a basic understanding of how the US housing system works, learn the vocabulary and jargon of the field, and begin to perceive how the system can be changed if they feel it needs to be. The course is conducted as a seminar, with a premium placed on active engagement in class conversations. Students prepare two brief papers, offering their opinions about potential improvements in our current housing delivery system. Reading is moderate and there is no exam. Grades are based on the two papers and the level of participation in class discussions. There are no prerequisites.
 


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