GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:09.

Courses taught by Robert Pietrusko

01211: Landscape Architecture III: Third Semester Core Studio (STU 0121100)

Landscape Architecture
Core Studio - 8 credits
Tuesday Thursday 12:30 - 6:00  

Instructor(s)
Pierre Bélanger, Niall Kirkwood, Luis Rodrigo Callejas Mujica, Kelly Doran, Rosetta Elkin, Andrea Hansen, Philippe Coignet, Robert Pietrusko

Course Description

Addressing the inertia of urban planning and the overexertion of civil engineering in the 20th century, this course focuses on the design of large, complex, contaminated brownfield sites with a regional, ecological and infrastructural outlook. Employing the agency of regional ecology and landscape infrastructure as the dominant drivers of design, the studio involves the development of biodynamic and biophysical systems that provide flexible yet directive patterns for future urbanization. Through a series of contemporary mapping methods, field measures, case studies, readings and design investigations, the course results in a series of collaborative exercises leading to a large scale design project and future scenarios. Drawing from canonical case studies on regional reclamation strategies from across the world, the studio is further enhanced by a robust, regional representation program. Focusing on the metrics of geospatial representation and remote sensing, two intensive workshops throughout the term of the studio didactically deal with the interrelated subjects of regional cartography and site topography as operative and telescopic instruments of design across scales. Contributing to a complex, multi-layered profiling of the site as ‘system’ and the reformulation of program as ‘process’, the studio establishes a base platform for engaging an array of complex issues related to site contamination, biophysical systems, regional ecology, land cover, urban infrastructure and economic geography. Precluding conventional forms of urban development such as housing or retail development, the penultimate objective of the course is to explore and articulate the potential effectiveness of broader and longer range strategies where biophysical systems prefigure as the denominator for re-envisioning public infrastructures and regional urban economies in the future.
 


GSD iCommons Website


01221: Elements of Urban Design (STU 0122100)

Urban Planning and Design
Core Studio - 8 credits
Tuesday Thursday 12:30 - 6:00  

Instructor(s)
Felipe Correa, Anita Berrizbeitia, Carles Muro, Carlos Garciavelez Alfaro, Robert Pietrusko

Course Description

Elements of Urban Design is an advanced core studio for the post professional programs in urban design. The studio introduces a wide host of ideas, strategies and technical skills associated with current thinking on urbanism, and speculates on the designer’s projective role in analyzing and shaping complex metropolitan systems. Rigorous research informs a series of interrelated exercises that construct diverse hypotheses about new formal and experiential urban identities across multiple scales of intervention and development.
 


GSD iCommons Website


02129: Spatial Analysis and Representation (VIS 0212900)

Urban Planning and Design
Lecture - 4 credits
Tuesday Thursday 11:30 - 1:00   Gund 518

Instructor(s)
David Gamble, Robert Pietrusko

Course Description

Urban planners engage in many complex processes that defy easy representation. This course provides first-semester urban planning students with the graphic and technical skills needed to reason, design and communicate these processes with geospatial data. This knowledge will be embedded within a larger critical framework that addresses the cultural history of categorization, data collection and cartography as tools of persuasion for organizing space.

Visual expression is one of the most compelling methods to describe the physical environment, and students will learn techniques specifically geared towards clarifying social, political and economic dynamics and how they relate the structuring of spaces. The class will introduce fundamentals of data collecting, data formatting and data importing into a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment.

Students will gain familiarity with the technical tools essential to GIS for making maps and exploring relationships in the physical, regulatory and demographic dimensions of the landscape. Within GIS, students will learn the basics of geospatial processing to produce new forms of knowledge in support of ideas about urban planning and design. Desktop publishing tools, including Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign will be used to distil ideas into effective graphic presentations. The class will also advance techniques for representing form and space through diagramming and three-dimensional modeling programs.

Students will be introduced to workflows that demonstrate how to move effectively between data from these platforms and modes of representation. Class lectures will be complemented with technical workshops.

Objectives:
1. Establish a conceptual framework for critically engaging the practices of mapping and data-visualization;
2. Provide a basic understanding of tools and techniques needed to reason, design and communicate with geospatial data;
3. Develop students' skill and confidence for visualizing the complex processes, flows, and dependencies unique to the planning discipline.

Prerequisites:
Enrollment in the Urban Planning program
 


GSD iCommons Website


Return to FACULTY list · Return to COURSE LISTING