GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:09.

Courses taught by Jana Cephas

03474: Critical Conservation as Social Activism: History, Theory, and Methods (DES 0347400)

Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Thursday 1:00 - 4:00   20 Sumner 1A

Instructor(s)
Jana Cephas

Course Description

Historic preservation strategies have been used by communities to achieve various social ends, ranging from staving off gentrification and restricting neighborhood development to developing tourist districts that attract travelers from around the world. In these instances, preservation policies have been deployed by groups from across the political spectrum, reflecting the ways in which these policies, practices, and methods have been used to define and delimit, to celebrate and exclude, to forge communities as well as to create further social divisions. This course analyzes the political effects of such strategies in the preservation of physical environments and cultural heritage by situating conservation practice within its historical, theoretical, and methodological origins. Through readings, discussions, and class assignments, students will extract a theory of a “critical conservation” by analyzing preservation history and theory, and by critically examining both the governmental and private sector tools and resources available to preservation practitioners at the local, regional, state, national, and global levels.

Topics to be covered include: the significance of historical significance; memory and the meaning of history; identity and its invention; cultural landscapes; public history and the place of preservation in the United States; the fair, the exhibition, and the museum in conservation planning; period rooms and the house museum; histories of heritage tourism and historic districts; designing the past at Colonial Williamsburg, Greenfield Village, and Disney; anti-monumentality and the anxiety of loss; memory infrastructure; the cultural politics of preservation in “post-racial” America; heritage in war and conflict; legislating memory; conservation and the recent past; and intangible heritage.

By the end of this course, each student should be able to:
1. Identify and define the broad themes affecting conservation practice today.
2. Discuss and explain the historical origins of conservation practice and its application to architecture, landscapes, and cities.
3. Identify and critique the major policies and institutions shaping conservation practice in the United States and globally.
4. Analyze the relations between planning, heritage, and politics.

To achieve a passing grade, students are required to attend class regularly; participate in class discussions; complete weekly readings; and complete three short papers and presentations.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Iñaki Abalos, Frank Apeseche, Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Joan Busquets, Jana Cephas, Ed Eigen, Rosetta Elkin, Andreas Georgoulias, Michael Hooper, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Alex Krieger, Judith Grant Long, Yanni Loukissas, David Mah, Rahul Mehrotra, Panagiotis Michalatos, Toshiko Mori, Mark Mulligan, Erika Naginski, Antoine Picon, Peter Rowe, Holly Samuelson, Allen Sayegh, Jorge Silvetti, Christine Smith, Maryann Thompson, Raymond Torto, Charles Waldheim, Bing Wang, Andrew Witt, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Cameron Wu, Diane Davis, Eric Howeler, Neil Brenner

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


09301: Independent Thesis in Satisfaction of Degree MArch (ADV 0930100)

Architecture
Research Seminar - 12 credits

Instructor(s)
Iñaki Abalos, Leire Asensio Villoria, Jana Cephas, Danielle Etzler, Eric Howeler, Florian Idenburg, Panagiotis Michalatos, Ingeborg Rocker, Allen Sayegh, Mack Scogin, Jorge Silvetti, Maryann Thompson, Andrew Witt, Cameron Wu, Ed Eigen

Course Description

 Each student conducts a design exploration that tests and expands the thesis.
Prerequisites: completion of two (2) options studios and approval of thesis preparation documents by thesis advisor.


GSD iCommons Website


09305: Master of Design Studies Final Project (ADV 0930500)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Jana Cephas, Yanni Loukissas, Erika Naginski, Krzysztof Wodiczko

Course Description

The Final Project will consist of a theoretical/position component, and of a practical/experimental component. The scope of each of the two components will be determined according to the student's preference, and considering the specific character of the project in consultation with the area coordinator and the advisor. In exceptional cases the final project may be solely based on (expanded in scope and ambition) a theoretical component. A theoretical, written component is required for all final projects. The final project is equivalent to 8 units of courseworkTheoretical/Position component-A written document presenting the original contribution to, and original argument for your artistic/design/research project defended within the context of current discourses in relevant disciplinary fields. The theoretical argument must present the original methodology of the project and position it in relation to:-Relevant present day artistic and design practices and their specific methodologies-Relevant theoretical and critical discourses (including your elaborations on relevant "pro" and "contra" positions)-The relevant historical tradition Practical/Experimental componentThis component involves an original artistic/design project conceived, developed and presented as a public presentation, exhibition, installation, performance, action, and intervention in a physical or/and electronic space. The public presentation is a crucial part of the final project and is required. The Final Project's printed presentation as publishable document (that contains the theoretical argument and a graphic and textual presentation of the practical/experimental component)is also required.


GSD iCommons Website


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