GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:09.

Courses taught by Erika Naginski

04121: Buildings, Texts, and Contexts I (HIS 0412100)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund - Piper

Instructor(s)
Erika Naginski, K. Michael Hays

Course Description

This course is structured as a dialogue between the historical and theoretical frameworks that have shaped the formulation of architectural principles - what the architectural historian Rudolf Wittkower called the "apparatus of forms" - by means of selected case studies. The organizing principle here is thematic as opposed to chronological, and synoptic rather than merely factual. We treat a selected range of concepts developed by philosophers and historians to explain the Classical and the Baroque as dialectical systems of thought that arise in history but transcend this history to mark modern and postmodern practices.


GSD iCommons Website


04490: Architecture and its Texts (1650-1800) (HIS 0449000)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Friday 9:00 - 12:00   40 Kirkland 1C

Instructor(s)
Erika Naginski

Course Description

This seminar focuses on a selection of important architectural writings from the late 17th and 18th centuries, with the aim of exploring the connections between architecture and textuality. We will proceed in two-week segments by pairing the close reading of given text with a theme that gives it shape as follows: Perrault and translation, Fischer von Erlach and archaeology; Laugier and origins; Bastide and eroticism; Piranesi and the avant-garde. This bi-fold structure will help us to think about how architecture and discourse come to define each other’s premises. Course work includes responses to readings, an oral presentation, and a final paper.

Prerequisites: Advanced knowledge of architectural history and theory is highly recommended. This course is intended primarily for students in the PhD, DDes, and MDEsS programs. Some places will be reserved for advanced MArch students who are beginning their thesis research.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Iñaki Abalos, Frank Apeseche, Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Joan Busquets, Jana Cephas, Ed Eigen, Rosetta Elkin, Andreas Georgoulias, Michael Hooper, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Alex Krieger, Judith Grant Long, Yanni Loukissas, David Mah, Rahul Mehrotra, Panagiotis Michalatos, Toshiko Mori, Mark Mulligan, Erika Naginski, Antoine Picon, Peter Rowe, Holly Samuelson, Allen Sayegh, Jorge Silvetti, Christine Smith, Maryann Thompson, Raymond Torto, Charles Waldheim, Bing Wang, Andrew Witt, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Cameron Wu, Diane Davis, Eric Howeler, Neil Brenner

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


09305: Master of Design Studies Final Project (ADV 0930500)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Jana Cephas, Yanni Loukissas, Erika Naginski, Krzysztof Wodiczko

Course Description

The Final Project will consist of a theoretical/position component, and of a practical/experimental component. The scope of each of the two components will be determined according to the student's preference, and considering the specific character of the project in consultation with the area coordinator and the advisor. In exceptional cases the final project may be solely based on (expanded in scope and ambition) a theoretical component. A theoretical, written component is required for all final projects. The final project is equivalent to 8 units of courseworkTheoretical/Position component-A written document presenting the original contribution to, and original argument for your artistic/design/research project defended within the context of current discourses in relevant disciplinary fields. The theoretical argument must present the original methodology of the project and position it in relation to:-Relevant present day artistic and design practices and their specific methodologies-Relevant theoretical and critical discourses (including your elaborations on relevant "pro" and "contra" positions)-The relevant historical tradition Practical/Experimental componentThis component involves an original artistic/design project conceived, developed and presented as a public presentation, exhibition, installation, performance, action, and intervention in a physical or/and electronic space. The public presentation is a crucial part of the final project and is required. The Final Project's printed presentation as publishable document (that contains the theoretical argument and a graphic and textual presentation of the practical/experimental component)is also required.


GSD iCommons Website


Return to FACULTY list · Return to COURSE LISTING