GSD Course Bulletin - Fall 2013

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:09.

Courses taught by Yanni Loukissas

03448: The Mixed-Reality City (DES 0344800)

Architecture
Seminar Workshop - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Thursday 3:00 - 6:00   Gund 522

Instructor(s)
Yanni Loukissas

Course Description

The contemporary city is constituted by multiple overlapping, intermixing realities articulated across built form and imagined space, individual experience and collective memory, embodied sensation and digital mediation. Often, these multiple realities are invisible or illegible, with certain narratives dominating particular environments. However, realities always leave traces, to be excavated and reconstructed. The Mixed-Reality City is an exploratory research seminar and workshop in which students pursue studies of urbanism-in-the-making through means and methods emerging in the digital arts and humanities, including: data narrative, digital ethnography, adversarial design, and critical technical practice. The course focuses in equal parts on unpacking discourses and developing interpretative digital artifacts.

This year, the course will examine the mixed-reality of natural and artificial environments, principally in the Northeastern United States. Projects will focus on historical and contemporary controversies over troubled natural or wild places and phenomena by exploring their associations and effects within cities. The class will pursue questions about the co-construction of the “natural” and the “artificial” as well as feral presences in cities: places and phenomena once domesticated, now returned to nature. Moreover, we will examine the relationship between natures and networks. What happens to technology in the wild? Can technology itself become feral?

We will read authors, such as Bruno Latour, Kevin Lynch, Michel DeCerteau, Leo Marx, Donna Haraway and William Cronon, who explain the mixed-reality of cities in their own ways. We will also engage the work of artists and designers who make a practice out of intervening into controversies: Natalie Jeremijenko, Sara Wylie, Kelly Dobson, Leanne Allison, Jeremy Mendes, Phoebe Sengers, and Carl DiSalivo. The Mixed-Reality City is a highly participatory class. Students will be expected to actively contribute to discussions and project critiques. At the beginning of the term there will be a rapid series of exercises in writing, mapping, and precedent analysis. Towards the end of the term, students will focus on lengthy final projects to interpret and intervene in mixed wild and constructed places in cities.

The course is open to all graduate students at Harvard and associated institutions. While there are no prerequisites, students are expected to bring basic skills in digital media. The Mixed-Reality City is hosted by metaLAB (at) Harvard, a research unit of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, focused on experiments in the arts and humanities.
 


GSD iCommons Website


09130: Design Learning Workshop (ADV 0913000)

Architecture
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Tuesday Thursday 12:00 - 1:30   Gund 522

Instructor(s)
Yanni Loukissas

Course Description

As part of a long-term initiative at the Graduate School of Design to develop new spaces for design learning, this course will explore nascent technological possibilities for project-based education. The Design Learning Workshop will examine both historical and contemporary examples of educational technologies and environments for design. Moreover, the workshop will serve as a setting in which to develop and evaluate new ways of positioning design—both materially and pedagogically—across disciplines. The course is open to graduate-level students from departments across the GSD and the entire university who have an interest in the future of design learning.

The course will have three main components. During the first phase of the course, students will examine histories and theories of design education with a particular emphasis on past pedagogical experiments. During the second phase of the course, students will disperse throughout the university to observe contemporary design education in a variety of disciplinary settings: not only in architecture, landscape, and urban design, but also in engineering, the humanities, the sciences, music, education, and others. During the final and most significant phase of the course, students will work in collaboration with selected other courses to prototype new design-centric learning technologies and environments. Over the course of the semester, the course will introduce students to observation-based research methods as well as technologies and strategies for collaborative design work.

The Design Learning Workshop will make use of a dedicated classroom space at the GSD with movable furniture and a toolkit of advanced technologies including large-scale networked displays, gesture-based control systems, high-end audio and video recording devices, and extensive staging equipment. The course is expected to produce exhibit-worthy prototypes of experimental design learning technologies and environments. Basic aptitude with a variety of creative software applications is expected. Fabrication and technology development skills are welcome, but not required.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Master's Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Iñaki Abalos, Frank Apeseche, Leire Asensio Villoria, Pierre Bélanger, Joan Busquets, Jana Cephas, Ed Eigen, Rosetta Elkin, Andreas Georgoulias, Michael Hooper, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Alex Krieger, Judith Grant Long, Yanni Loukissas, David Mah, Rahul Mehrotra, Panagiotis Michalatos, Toshiko Mori, Mark Mulligan, Erika Naginski, Antoine Picon, Peter Rowe, Holly Samuelson, Allen Sayegh, Jorge Silvetti, Christine Smith, Maryann Thompson, Raymond Torto, Charles Waldheim, Bing Wang, Andrew Witt, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Cameron Wu, Diane Davis, Eric Howeler, Neil Brenner

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


09305: Master of Design Studies Final Project (ADV 0930500)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 0 credits

Instructor(s)
Jana Cephas, Yanni Loukissas, Erika Naginski, Krzysztof Wodiczko

Course Description

The Final Project will consist of a theoretical/position component, and of a practical/experimental component. The scope of each of the two components will be determined according to the student's preference, and considering the specific character of the project in consultation with the area coordinator and the advisor. In exceptional cases the final project may be solely based on (expanded in scope and ambition) a theoretical component. A theoretical, written component is required for all final projects. The final project is equivalent to 8 units of courseworkTheoretical/Position component-A written document presenting the original contribution to, and original argument for your artistic/design/research project defended within the context of current discourses in relevant disciplinary fields. The theoretical argument must present the original methodology of the project and position it in relation to:-Relevant present day artistic and design practices and their specific methodologies-Relevant theoretical and critical discourses (including your elaborations on relevant "pro" and "contra" positions)-The relevant historical tradition Practical/Experimental componentThis component involves an original artistic/design project conceived, developed and presented as a public presentation, exhibition, installation, performance, action, and intervention in a physical or/and electronic space. The public presentation is a crucial part of the final project and is required. The Final Project's printed presentation as publishable document (that contains the theoretical argument and a graphic and textual presentation of the practical/experimental component)is also required.


GSD iCommons Website


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