GSD Course Bulletin - Spring 2014

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:41.

Courses taught by Peter Rowe

01506: Obsolescence and Pathways to Redevelopment: The Shekou Industrial District in Shenzhen, China (STU 0150600)

Urban Planning and Design
Option Studio - 8 credits - Limited enrollment
Tuesday Wednesday 2:00 - 6:00  

Instructor(s)
Peter Rowe

Course Description

A striking aspect of China’s recent modernization and urbanization has been a relatively high rate of obsolescence, variously pegged at around 30 years for many built structures. Consequently, as China moves forward, redevelopment and renewal will become an increasingly large part of its developmental agenda. As one of the earliest excursions into modern industrial and urban development since China’s historic opening up in 1978, the Shekou Industrial District in Shenzhen, dating from 1979, now confronts areas of moribund and obsolete development at the same time that it is part of the newly developing economic zone of Qinhai. The issue to be confronted in the studio is how should the industrial district comport itself and be reconfigured to best leverage the obsolescence of the plant and other facilities and ongoing new development. To date, when considering redevelopment, those in China have pursued several strategies, including: outright conservation and re-use, demolition with or without selective renewal, deployment of so-called ‘creative districts’, retrofitting for re-use, and new building but re-interpreted according to some version of past practice. More specifically, the study area comprises much of the Shekou District of Shenzhen and is located on the western end of the east-west alignment of the city’s development, roughly parallel to the border with Hong Kong. Development there was initially on approximately 11 square kilometers of land. Over time, this area expanded, largely through land reclamation to a size of about 25 square kilometers or more. Today, Shekou houses a population of some 300,000 inhabitants, but in the studio study area is also made up of extensive corporate and industrial land holdings of varying vintage and degrees of obsolescence, including a large glass factory, now being partially re-used as an exhibition space. In scope, the studio will include overall planning proposals for all or part of the study area, more specific urban design proposals for particular redevelopment opportunities within the area, and urban-architectural proposals for specific building scale projects, including incorporation of the re-use of older, disused facilities. A field trip to Shenzhen is tentatively planned for the fifth week of term (nominally Feb 22 to Mar 1, 2014).


GSD iCommons Website


04344: Modern Architecture and Urbanism in China (HIS 0434400)

Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits - Limited enrollment
Monday 2:00 - 5:00   Gund 510

Instructor(s)
Peter Rowe

Course Description


Modernizing influences, largely from the hands of foreign powers, first forcefully entered China in the aftermath of the Opium War and signing of the Treaty of Nanjing in 1842. Since then, China endured a stormy if not tumultuous course of events before finding itself with burgeoning modern industrialization and urbanization during the contemporary era, as well as a certain ambivalence about the shape of its future identity. Against this historical backdrop, modern architecture and urbanism developed spasmodically, before emerging strongly during the past decade or so. Rather than attempting to provide a continuous and cohesive narrative of these developments, this seminar will concentrate on significant episodes during the last 150 or so years. Of particular interest will be the work of several generations of Chinese architects, planners, and public officials, as well as that of foreign architects and planners, working in China during various periods. The aim of the course will be to introduce students to this modern work and underlying attitudes, together with cultural influences, which lay behind them. Students will be expected to be prepared for seminar discussion, by undertaking prescribed readings, and to produce an article-length research paper on a pertinent topic. There are no prerequisites for this course.


GSD iCommons Website


05211: Cities by Design II (SES 0521100)

Urban Planning and Design
Lecture - 4 credits
Tuesday Thursday 10:00 - 11:30   Gund - Piper

Instructor(s)
Rahul Mehrotra, Eve Blau, Ricky Burdett, Jose Castillo, Jana Cephas, Peter Rowe, Christine Smith, Erkin Ozay

Course Description

The year-long ‘Cities by Design’ course is mandatory for all incoming Masters of Urban Design Students. All other students are welcome to enroll in the course by semester, and need not do so in sequence.

Cities by Design studies urban form. Each semester, 'Cities by Design' will examine six cities as case studies in order to expose students to a range of factors that affect the design of contemporary cities in various geographical contexts. The case studies will focus on both the urban condition as a whole by exploring processes of urban evolution, and on the study of urban fragments and projects. Each case study will be comprised of three or four lectures and one discussion section. The Spring Case Studies consists of Berlin, London, Mexico City, Rome, Detroit, and Mumbai.

Two main pedagogical objectives guide the course: (1) to engage students in a comparative study of cities that will broaden their definition of the ‘urban’, and (2) to build the historical framework within which they will identify the urban characteristics and design strategies that render particular cities distinct. Comparative analyses of the urban case studies will be guided by the following eight themes, which will be explored through the lectures, section discussions, and assigned readings:

1. The city's genealogy and key historical events, phases of development & patterns of growth.
2. The ways in which the terrain, geography, and infrastructural development constrain and present opportunities for the city's development and ambitions.
3. The city's planning and design culture and decision-making institutions.
4. The challenges that social equity present to planning and design in the city.
5. The orchestration of the city's relationship to the broader region.
6. How the particular city contributes to a definition of the 'urban' condition.
7. The framing and design of key urban projects/case studies.
8. The city's planning institutions, historical conditions, urban forms, or ambitions, etc. that have contributed to its iconicity in a global context.
Term grades will be based on attendance and participation in both lectures and section discussions, biweekly response papers, and a final term paper.

Faculty for Spring 2014 to include: Rahul Mehrotra and Erkin Ozay (course coordinators), with Eve Blau, Ricky Burdett, Jose Castillio, Jana Cephas, Peter Rowe, and Christine Smith.

Teaching Fellows: Ozlem Altinkaya and Olga Touloumi

No Prerequisites.


GSD iCommons Website


09201: Independent Study by Candidates for Masters Degrees (ADV 0920100)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Beth Altringer, Neil Brenner, Joan Busquets, Felipe Correa, Diane Davis, Peter Del Tredici, Sonja Duempelmann, Ed Eigen, K. Michael Hays, Michael Hooper, Jane Hutton, Niall Kirkwood, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Sanford Kwinter, Kiel Moe, Richard Peiser, Robert Pietrusko, Peter Rowe, David Sanderson, Jorge Silvetti, James Stockard, Maryann Thompson, Bing Wang, Matthew Wilson, Cameron Wu, Ann Forsyth, Rahul Mehrotra

Course Description

Students may take a maximum of 8 credit units with different instructors in this course series.Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Candidates may arrange individual work focusing on subjects or issues that are of interest to them but are not available through regularly offered course work. Students must submit an independent study petition and secure approval of their advisor and of the faculty member sponsoring the study.


GSD iCommons Website


09302: Independent Thesis in Satisfaction of the Degree MAUD, MLAUD, or MUP (ADV 0930200)

Urban Planning and Design
Research Seminar - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Eric Belsky, Joan Busquets, Luis Rodrigo Callejas Mujica, Jana Cephas, Daniel D'Oca, Diane Davis, Alex Krieger, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Michael Hooper

Course Description

Following preparation in GSD 9204, each student pursues a topic of relevance to urban design or urban planning, which may include design or planning exploration, academic inquiry, or a combination thereof.


GSD iCommons Website


09503: Preparation of Doctoral Thesis Proposal (ADV 0950300)

Architecture
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, Diane Davis, K. Michael Hays, Antoine Picon, Peter Rowe

Course Description

Under faculty guidance, the student conducts a reading program and formulates a thesis proposal. The course is intended for doctoral students.


GSD iCommons Website


09504: Thesis in Satisfaction of the Degree Doctor of Design (ADV 0950400)

Architecture
Independent Study - 16 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, Anita Berrizbeitia, Antoine Picon, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Charles Waldheim

Course Description

Under guidance of a faculty committee, the student conducts investigations and prepares a doctoral thesis.


GSD iCommons Website


09506: Thesis Extension in Satisfaction of Degree Doctor of Design (ADV 0950600)

Landscape Architecture
Independent Study - 16 credits

Instructor(s)
Martin Bechthold, Jerold Kayden, Spiro Pollalis, Christoph Reinhart, Peter Rowe, A. Hashim Sarkis, Charles Waldheim

Course Description

Under guidance of a faculty committee, the student conducts investigations and prepares a doctoral thesis.


GSD iCommons Website


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