GSD Course Bulletin - Spring 2014

This term's information was last refreshed on 12 MAY 2015 14:55:41.

Courses taught by Erika Naginski

04423: The Shapes of Utopia (HIS 0442300)

Architecture
Lecture - 4 credits
Monday 10:00 - 1:00   42 Kirkland 1G

Instructor(s)
Erika Naginski

Course Description

Utopia's fall from grace in the modern period is tied to architecture's failure in giving shape to dreams of a new society wrought from social and political transformation. Its memorable articulations appear in a venerable philosophical and literary tradition, including Plato's Republic, Augustine's City of God, More's utopian city of Amaurote. Its significant disarticulations materialize in Foucault, Tafuri and the dismal outcome of modernist projects like Pruitt-Igoe. Utopia divulges the oscillation of a concept associated with arcadian pasts or ordered futures, naive idealism or repressive totalitarianism, phalansteries or simple living, mental escapism or technological promise. The course takes a synoptic approach by considering key writings and architectural experiments. We begin with a selection of foundational texts, which posit an architectural matrix for the construction of a more perfect world. We then turn to those architectural proposals, from Ledoux to Le Corbusier, which attempted to reify the guiding principles of an improved social order. We conclude with theoretical and architectural critiques emerging in modernism's wake.


GSD iCommons Website


09305: Master of Design Studies Final Project (ADV 0930500)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 8 credits

Instructor(s)
Jana Cephas, Joyce Klein-Rosenthal, Yanni Loukissas, Erika Naginski, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Susan Snyder, George Thomas

Course Description

The Final Project will consist of a theoretical/position component, and of a practical/experimental component. The scope of each of the two components will be determined according to the student's preference, and considering the specific character of the project in consultation with the area coordinator and the advisor. In exceptional cases the final project may be solely based on (expanded in scope and ambition) a theoretical component. A theoretical, written component is required for all final projects. The final project is equivalent to 8 units of coursework.

Theoretical/Position component

A written document presenting the original contribution to, and original argument for your artistic/design/research project defended within the context of current discourses in relevant disciplinary fields.

The theoretical argument must present the original methodology of the project and position it in relation to:

Practical/Experimental component

This component involves an original artistic/design project conceived, developed and presented as a public presentation, exhibition, installation, performance, action, and intervention in a physical or/and electronic space. The public presentation is a crucial part of the final project and is required. The Final Project's printed presentation as publishable document (that contains the theoretical argument and a graphic and textual presentation of the practical/experimental component)is also required.


GSD iCommons Website


09502: Independent Study by Candidates for Doctoral Degrees (ADV 0950200)

Urban Planning and Design
Independent Study - 4 credits

Instructor(s)
Neil Brenner, Erika Naginski, Susan Snyder

Course Description

Under faculty guidance, the student conducts a reading program and formulates a thesis proposal. The course is intended for doctoral students.


GSD iCommons Website


09692: Discourse and Methods II (ADV 0969200)

Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning and Design
Seminar - 4 credits
Friday 12:00 - 3:00   40 Kirkland 1C

Instructor(s)
Erika Naginski

Course Description

This is one of two seminars fulfilling a requirement for successful completion of the PHD curriculum. The seminar is designed as an introduction to canonical texts in the history and theory of architecture, landscape architecture, and/or urbanism, which have come to define practices and the disciplinary conception of these respective domains. We thereby address the subjects of history, theory, and the human sciences as they have been enlisted in writings about the building, the landscape, and the city for students preparing for or enrolled in PHD degree programs.

Prerequisites: This course is normally open only to doctoral students in the PHD Program in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning and Design. Doctoral students from other programs or post-professional masters students at the GSD may participate with the instructor's permission.


GSD iCommons Website


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