Arduino Workshop- Basic to Intermediate, Stephen Ervin

Arduino Workshop & Advance Studio, Stephen Ervin

FULL – Creating a Simple Book, Irina Gorstein

DynamicMutations GSD V3.0

Foucault's Archaeological Method, Ryan Beitz

Design Poetics / Poetics Design, Benjamin Bromberg Gaber & Sarah Shapiro

Rhetoric as Argument: Writing for Designers, Hung Vo

Memory and the Public Sphere: Abstraction, Agonism, Representation and Restitution, Eric Moed

Web Basics, Malinda (Mindy) Seu

Playful Media, Nicolas Oueijan & Stella Rossikopoulou Pappa

Resume + Presentation Skills for Non-Native English Speakers, Samuel Maddox & Adelle York

Hand Rendering for Designers, Samuel Maddox & Adelle York

Group Exercise, Dohyun Lee & Youngjin Song

Making the Industrial Basket at Three Scales, Stephen Burk

Power & Practice: Things you should know as you proceed to make your vision for a better world a reality, Andrea Reimer, Jeana Dunlap & Maria Cabildo, Loeb

Spatial analytics & International Planning: Integration of Research & Practice,  Sang Cho, Juan Carlos, Sulhee Yoon & Barry Fradkin

Machine Learning for Art and Design, Spyridon Ampanavos & Sabrina Osmany

Designing Coalitions, Sidra Fatima

From Protein to Product, Julian Siegelmann

Participatory Design, Michael Smith (Loeb Fellow), Ignacio Cardona (DDes), Yazmín M. Crespo (DDes) & Eduardo Peláez (MDes)

Basic Architectural Model Photography I, Adam DeTour

Rebuilding with Nature: Observing Land-Water-Human Linkages in San Juan Water Systems, Judith Rodriguez


Arduino Workshop – Basic to Intermediate

Instructor: Stephen Ervin
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 15

The DIY digital control system known as “Arduino” has spawned a worldwide community of makers, hackers, hobbyists & designers, playing with low-cost analog-to-digital input devices (sensors) and digital-to-analog outputs (actuators) combined with an extensive public code library and a family of powerful, flexible microprocessors to create interactive machines (robots) and responsive environments. Learn the basics, or add to your skills, and get started with (or continue on) a personal project, in 1 or 2 days. Day 1: Basics: Assumes no prior experience. Day 2 – Intermediate: Assumes Day 1, or prior knowledge of Basics. Sign up for either day separately, or both together. Requires at least your own Arduino microprocessor, ($25-$50); additional goodies recommended in an optional shopping list distributed in advance. Some coding experience will help.

Date Tues, Jan 15 Wed, Jan 16
Time 9am-4pm 9am-4pm

Prerequisites: Day 1 or equivalent required for Day 2
Cost/Materials: $25 -$50


Arduino Workshop & Advanced Studio

Instructor: Stephen Ervin
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 12

Got your Arduino (or other, e.g. Raspberry Pi, etc.) intermediate skills, and want to start a specific project? Or have your project started / underway, and want to work on it intensively with others ? This one day studio/workshop is an opportunity to share & extend your work, get friendly crits & possibly helpful advice… Assumes you have intermediate skills, and a project underway, or close enough to getting started to have bought some materials for it. Team projects welcome. Requires your own Arduino or other microprocessor, all attached equipment, and a project description.

Date Thurs, Jan 17
Time 9am-5pm

Prerequisites: Intermediate skills and a specific project
Cost/Materials: 


Creating a Simple Book

Instructor: Irina Gorstein
Location: Frances Loeb Library Conservation Lab, L01
Max Enrollment: 6

Weissman Preservation Center offers a two-day seminar on bookmaking for the GSD J-Term. The workshop is limited to 6 participants and will be held at the Frances Loeb Library Conservation Lab, L01.

The seminar will focus on four non-adhesive structures based on historic bindings. The skills learnt during the workshop can be used for creating attractive portfolios and notebooks.

Date Thur, Jan 10 Fri, Jan 11
Time 9am-5pm 9am-5pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $20 -$25

WORKSHOP FULL – REGISTRATION CLOSED


DynamicMutations GSD V3.0

Instructors: Pavlina Vardoulaki & Alejandra Rojas
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 20

https://designmorphine.org/

Autodesk Maya’s vast capabilities have been dominating the film and video game industry for years as the standard in design and CGI work flow. Both entertainment forms require tools to create imaginary spaces that can be parametrically designed to change at any given time, adapting to new ideas. Since its creation, Maya has also been adapted into other major industries such as automotive design, product design, and prototyping fields in general. More and more architectural studios acknowledge its potential in forming building structures, providing new design logic, advanced free-form modeling, and surpassing the boundaries of linear design tools. Maya’s design logic and generative processes achieve diversity and complexity in form generation. Unlike many 3d modeling software, Maya gives the user a more natural modeling environment similar to modeling with clay in your hands. This allows concept phase models to quickly come to life with a better connection between the foreseen vision and the 3d results. The goal for this workshop is to teach students how to model complex geometry in Maya while dynamically mutating it, quickly building up versions of the initial idea. Students will learn the modeling shortcuts used by major design houses to create unique designs in the most time efficient ways possible. Most importantly, students will learn to create models which allow flexibility in design decisions via cataloged history states as opposed to having to re-do a model when changes are needed. The final portion of the workshop will provide students with high quality visualization techniques using Luxion Keyshot. Students should bring their own laptops with Autodesk Maya and Luxion Keyshot installed. Autodesk Maya can be downloaded and used for free up to 3 years under a student license on Autodesk's website. Luxion Keyshot can be downloaded as a watermark free 14-day trial on Keyshots website.

Date Thur, Jan 17 Fri, Jan 18
Time 9am-5pm 9am-5pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Foucault's Archaeological Method

Instructor: Ryan Beitz, MDes
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: N/A

The aim of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the philosophical methodology for the analysis of discourse (a.k.a. “archaeology”) developed by Michel Foucault in The Archaeology of Knowledge and other works. By the end of this course, students will have a general understanding of the principles of Foucault's archaeological methodology such that they can apply the method to their own scholarly pursuits (e.g. term papers, thesis work, etc.). Students will gain an appreciation of Foucault's place within the history of philosophy. Students will also learn the details concerning the relationship between the archaeological and genealogical aspects of Foucault's methodology (a chronically misunderstood dimension of his work). In addition to gaining the power to apply Foucault's archaeological method to their own scholarly pursuits, students will also learn to explain the fundamentals of Foucault's philosophical project to non-specialists; orient themselves when interpreting complex and difficult texts; and track ongoing scholarly dialogues which rely on Foucault's work. This course assumes no background in the history of philosophy, though students with any amount of philosophical background are entirely welcome to participate. Again, since the primary aim of the course is to develop a working understanding of Foucault's approach to discourse analysis for practical use on the part of students, course discussion and progress through assigned materials will move at the pace of collective classroom understanding, and not by sheer volume of intake. In other words, we will not “slog” through hoards of text. Rather, we will aim to understand key concepts from a selection of textual passages as a group for everyone's benefit.

Date Mon, Jan 7 Fri, Jan 11 Mon, Jan 14
Time 2-5pm 2-5pm 2-5pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Design Poetics / Poetics Design

Instructors: Benjamin Bromberg Gaber (M.Arch) and Sarah Shapiro (UMass Boston MFA Poetry) Candidate
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 10

The blank page is the same as blank space. If you can understand blank space, this course will help you articulate the same emotions in written words. Many people use visual media, science, and music as design tools to enrich their own projects; this course explores how poetry can be a design tool. Poetry and architecture share similar concerns and require creative approaches to structure, form, and content. This course will introduce students to concrete poetry, traditional forms, erasure, ekphrastic poetics, and place-based poetic practices. Through imitation and informal workshops (pedagogical methods that both disciplines utilize), we will learn how designing a page is not so different from designing a building.

To begin, students will bring an image of a building that they have been to and admire. We will read and discuss poems and poetic forms, then use these forms to respond to our chosen buildings. By the end of the course, students will have written their own poetry, and will produce a drawing or physical model inspired by their written work.

Each day, we will observe and discuss genre-bending poetic and architectural precedents. Then through pinup discussions and in-class workshops, we will blur the line between design and poetry, incorporating the two into the design process. This course will be co-taught by a UMass Boston MFA Poetry candidate and 4th year M.Arch I. We will also discuss ways to use poetry to make design presentations more engaging and powerful. You will write, design, write, design, and write some more, but no previous writing experience is necessary. The class will culminate in a reading/review.

Date Tues, Jan 8 Thur, Jan 10 Tues, Jan 15 Thur, Jan 17
Time 2-6pm 2-6pm 2-6pm 2-6pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $10-20 printing and model making costs per student

Enrollment Link


Rhetoric as Argument: Writing for Designers

Instructor: Hung Vo, MUP
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 12

This course introduces design students to rhetorical approaches for writing and argumentation and provides strategies for effective communication in the design profession. It will focus on how students can formulate an argument, structure an essay, and avoid common mistakes. Various forms of writing assignments will be considered, including the reflection paper, the reading response and the analytical paper. While the focus will be on how students can better persuade readers, attention will be paid to how they can inform an audience, such as their studio reviewers. Students who have difficulty expressing or organizing their ideas will find this course especially helpful. As this course is intended to be an intensive boot camp on rhetorical skills, in-class participation is expected, and short writing assignments will be assigned. We will focus on the writing “process” as much as the final “product,” through various invention, revision, and editing activities. Students will leave with this course with more confidence in their rhetorical abilities.

Date Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17 Fri, Jan 18
Time 3-5pm 3-5pm 3-5pm


Prerequisites: Students are asked to submit an essay they previously wrote prior to the first class.
Cost/Materials: Material costs

Enrollment Link


Memory and the Public Sphere: Abstraction, Agonism, Representation and Restitution

Instructor: Eric Moed, MDes
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 12

How has Memory been represented in the Public Sphere over time? Who controls memorial narratives? What are the formal and methodological strategies that have been employed by individuals and communities? By the State? What are the aims and effects of well-known/visited memorial/monumental constructs? What even constitutes a monument or memorial? Should memorials and monuments be permanent, semi-permanent, ever-changing, ephemeral? How have history and memory been canonized through monuments and memorials and more deeply, can monuments and memorials challenge hegemonic state narratives?

This course provides a critical historical overview of post-WWII memorialization, providing a dialectic to pre-20th century figurative/formal monuments and memorials. Can the trajectory from memorializing hegemonic history to democratic memory lead to citizen-led agonistic memorials and monuments? What would an agonistic memorial/monument be?

Date Tues, Jan 15 Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17 Fri, Jan 18
Time 11am – 1pm 11am – 1pm 11am – 1pm 11am – 1pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Web Basics

Instructor: Malinda (Mindy) Seu, MDes
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 12

This course focuses on the fundamentals of web design and coding. Students will learn a brief history of the internet, from the founding principles to contemporary net art. By the end of the course, students will use HTML and CSS to create a working website. For beginners! No previous coding experience required.

Date Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17 Fri, Jan 18
Time 10am – 1pm 10am – 1pm 10am – 1pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Playful Media

Instructors: Nicolas Oueijan (MDes) and Stella Rossikopoulou Pappa (MDes)
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 20

“For every Way,” wrote the renowned game designer Bernie DeKoven, “there’s a way of following that Way that’s fun.” Playable Media is a 4 day course which brings this insight and philosophy about play into the design fields present at the GSD. Game Design, from systems thinking to playtesting with others, is a powerful design methodology which breaks down complex networks of causal relationships into digestible processes accessible within a low-stakes space of “play”. Through Game Design, we are able to distill such problems into constituent components and communicate their significance to our audiences (and each other) in a context conducive to failure, teamwork, bargaining, cheating, generosity, competition, and more. Aided with an introduction to notable works in the field of Game Studies and with playtime in other games, students will develop and showcase physical games around the theme of “Coming of Age.” They will complete every step of the game design process from ideation to packaging, and will leave with the conceptual, theoretical, and technical skills needed to assemble a meaningful game from a larger web of systems.

Date Mon, Jan 14 Tues, Jan 15 Wed, Jan 16 Fri, Jan 18
Time 11am – 4pm 11am – 4pm 11am – 4pm 11am – 4pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Students will be expected to produce physical prototypes for their games, but the materiality of these games and their scale is up to the students themselves.

Enrollment Link


Resume + Presentation Skills for Non-Native English Speakers

Instructors: Samuel Maddox (MDes) and Adelle York (MDes)
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 10

Students will be introduced to advanced English skills through a series of workshops for both academic and professional settings and applications. The course will be divided into two workshops: one will cover generating and organizing résumés and curriculum vitae, and one to assist in developing verbal presentation skills catered to the format of design or research-based work. Through the workshop setting, students will be able to discuss their most challenging aspects of communicating in English, practice speaking in a safe space, and be offered a set of resources for post-course learning.

Date Fri, Jan 18
Time 9am – 4pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Hand Rendering for Designers

Instructors: Samuel Maddox (MDes) and Adelle York (MDes)
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 8

This course is directed toward students at the GSD that do not have backgrounds in design and are seeking additional skills in hand graphic representation. It will not only be an artistic exploration of different media and techniques, but it will also be geared toward how to incorporate these new skills into the design process. It will focus on a minimum of two media that are useful in articulating design: watercolor painting and pencil/graphite sketching. Additional media can be brought into the course by students in order to explore and get feedback on individual technique and artistic representation. The two-day course will be split equally between learning fundamental skills in each media and artistic exploration of a chosen medium.

Date Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17
Time 10am – 3pm 10am – 3pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Group Exercise

Instructors: Dohyun Lee, M. Arch & Youngjin Song, MDes and Irving Fellow
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 8

In our moment, we see often a work of art and architecture credited to more than one individual, indicating that the work is a result of a collaboration. There are many artists and architects who are referred as a group, especially as a group of two. This J-Term workshop aims to inquire into this prevalent but not-too-much investigated theme: working as a pair. In this field of collaboration, is it possible to say that there’s such thing as a pure independent or individual work?

In this workshop, we will discuss and explore the idea of working together, as a group of two. Through a series of “group exercises” across different media and genre, we want to experience the dynamics and merits of working with the other. Suggested readings and case studies will be provided by the workshop instructors. The work produced during the workshop will be put into a publication and exhibition.

Date Fri, Jan 11 Tues, Jan 15 Thur, Jan 17
Time 10am – 1pm 10am – 1pm 10am – 1pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Making the Industrial Basket at Three Scales

Instructor: Stephen Burk, Loeb Fellow
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 12

Running antithetically to the ongoing Stephen Burks Man Made project of extending artisanal production into the future, The Industrial Basket at Three Scales presupposes that all handicrafts may one day be replaced by digital fabrication. As such, everyday objects like the basket must be analyzed and redesigned to translate their ancient wisdom into technically sophisticated products that assume consumer participatory assembly to maintain their one-of-a-kind qualities. Students will deconstruct, analyze, reimagine, and redesign these age-old vessels of meaning for industrial production in three possible scales; the hand (basket as accessory), the body (basket as furnishing), and the interior (basket as dwelling).

Date Jan 7 – Jan 18
Time 2-6pm

Prerequisites: Familiarity with hand & machine tools
Cost/Materials: Material costs

Enrollment Link


Power & Practice: Things you should know as you proceed to make your vision for a better world a reality

Instructors: Andrea Reimer, Jeana Dunlap & Maria Cabildo, Loeb Fellows
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 30

Over the span of two days, you will explore your awakening to a commitment to create a more just and equitable world, gain insight into successful approaches to engaging public officials and others who can assist you as you work to implement your vision; and, finally, gain an understanding of the practice of power and how it plays out in your daily interactions as a practitioner. The second day will be devoted to the Power Game, a role playing exercise that teaches us about different kinds of power and how we can effectively use our power and influence to get things done. You will come away with a greater understanding of your own power and how to navigate the corridors of power you will surely walk as you implement your vision in the real world.

Date Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17
Time 10am – 4:30pm 10am – 4:30pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Spatial Analytics & International Planning: Integration of Research & Practice

Instructors: Sang Cho (DDes), Juan Carlos (DDes ‘08), Sulhee Yoon (PhD at University of Florida) & Barry Fradkin (MS at University of Massachusetts )
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 10

The objective of this course is to present current and emerging approaches in developing international planning interventions. This course brings together students in the fields with an interest in spatial analytics, urban informatics, participatory planning to: 1) explore the method/application used in international planning, 2) debate how these tools are useful in building implementations, and 3) advance the ability to collect, store, and process a large set of data used in practice. Students will learn to perform practical, test application of spatial analytic operations to assess territorial analysis in multiple scales, regional to local, to identify areas of constraints and opportunities that address climatic, socioeconomic, and environmental challenges.

Day 1 (1/9)- How design-thinking can be apply to international development planning? Integrating design-thinking and spatial analytics to empower decision-making.
Day 2 (1/10)- Introduce cases where spatial analytics methods that integrate qualitative and quantitative approaches to solve international planning challenges.
Day 3 (1/11)- From design intent and data to storytelling strategy. How to convey planning strategies to decision-makers and development policy officials.

Date Wed, Jan 9 Thur, Jan 10 Fri, Jan 11
Time  9am-5pm  9am-5pm 9am-5pm

Prerequisites: Some proficiency in ArcGIS is ideal, but course is open to all students
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Machine Learning for Art and Design

Instructors: Spyridon Ampanavos, DDes & Sabrina Osmany, PhD
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 15

This workshop will serve as an introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning techniques as they apply to generative art and design. New advances in deep learning have led to the blossoming of novel techniques for visual concept representation. Advanced pattern recognition techniques have allowed for the development of remarkable new ways for computers to be able to generate images from semantic prompts, transfer the style of one image to the content of another, convert black and white images to coloured ones, transform noisy images to high fidelity, and many more. Moreover, access to these techniques has been democratized by practitioners through easy to use and high level Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and platforms. This provides access to designers and artists who may not have a computational background with abundant opportunity to enhance or redirect their work. Over the course of three days students will learn the basics of neural networks and deep learning, with an up to date understanding of current state of the art in generative design. We will cover the basic ideas and techniques as well as teach core skills in ML frameworks such as Keras, Tensorflow, etc. Students will complete the workshop with a hands on generative design project.

Date Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17 Fri, Jan 18
Time 12 – 3pm 12 – 3pm 12 – 3pm

Prerequisites: Basic programming skills
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Designing Coalitions

Instructors: Sidra Fatima, MUP
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 15

This course explores and encourages intersections between “problems” in cities that have traditionally been considered separately but need to be recognized as connected. As designers and planners investigate issues dealing with the built environment, it is important to understand the underlying invisible structures of hegemonic oppression we work on top of. By recognizing the ways that things are connected and symbiotic, we can begin to explore our roles and power as city-dwellers and the way we approach city-making. Part I highlights interconnected threads in current challenges,  exploring how often silo-ed topics in planning – including gentrification, migration, housing, transportation, climate resilience, and environmental justice – are inextricably linked / cannot be solved independently. Part II unearths the invisible and visible infrastructures, policies, and plans that form the foundation for these issues. Part III digs into identity, in order to both understand and counter the ideological oppression which shapes the way people think, act, and design. Part IV explores counter-cultures and forms of resistance through a mixture of music, film, and art. Part V invites the class to imagine how we can build coalitions towards alternative city / urban models [or models of urbanism] and systems of liberation.

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 7 Tues, Jan 8 Wed, Jan 9 Thur, Jan 10 Fri, Jan 11
Time 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm

 Week 2

Date Mon, Jan 14 Tues, Jan 15 Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17 Fri, Jan 18
Time 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm 10am  – 12:30pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


From Protein to Product

Instructors: Julian Siegelmann¸ MDE
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 10

From Protein to Product offers a consumer-first and supply-chain-oriented product design workshop in the fabric space. We will be working with adaptive and water activated textiles from an on-campus lab to ideate and develop use-case driven product designs. The course will start off with an ideation workshop, and will then dive into feasibility and viability studies to evaluate launch-ability. The class hopes to instill an entrepreneurial mindset that bridges design and engineering, invoke a sensibility to designing for value (cost benefit), and help foster cross-campus collaboration with SEAS labs and post-docs. There might be an opportunity to continue this work throughout the semester.

Date Mon, Jan 14 Wed, Jan 16 Fri, Jan 18
Time 9am  – 2pm 9am  – 2pm 9am  – 2pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Papers and pens

Enrollment Link


Participatory Design

Instructors: Michael Smith (Loeb Fellow), Ignacio Cardona (DDes), Yazmín M. Crespo (Ph.D) & Eduardo Peláez (MDes)
Location: Gund Hall/ CMAA Lowell, Boston
Max Enrollment: N/A

Action Research on community engagement within the built environment. The course starts with seminars on participatory design methods, tools, best practices, and critiques case studies. Then a community organization within the Boston Area will be visited to understand ongoing challenges and to facilitate a participatory design process. Further seminars and workshops will provide the space to practice acquired skills within the real case. Final results will be presented to the community organization.

Wed, Jan 9 Thur, Jan 10 Fri, Jan 11 Mon, Jan 14 Tues, Jan 15 Wed, Jan 16 Thurs, Jan 17
2-6pm 2-6pm 2-4pm 2-6pm 2-6pm 2-6pm 2-4pm
Seminar

GSD

Seminar

GSD 

Community

Visit

Seminar

GSD

Workshop

On site

Workshop

GSD

Workshop

On site

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Basic Architectural Model Photography I

Instructors: Adam DeTour, Photographer
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: 20

Portfolio: https://www.adamdetourphotography.com

Course instructs students in the technical and compositional aspects of photographing architectural models for their portfolios, marketing materials and social media. Technical aspects will cover use of daylight vs. artificial light (including mixing colored gel lighting), use of professional cameras vs. iPhone cameras, composing creatively, and minor post production techniques.

Date Tues, Jan 8
Time 10:00am – 1:00pm

If enrollment exceeds 20, a possible second workshop will be added from 2-6pm on January 8th.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Rebuilding with Nature: Observing Land-Water-Human Linkages in San Juan Water Systems

Instructor: Judith Rodriguez, Research Associate and MLA/MAUD 13’
Location: TBD
Max Enrollment: N/A

The objective of this course is to observe the trajectory of watercourses in the San Juan Bay Estuary to give insights on sustainability and resilience to the ongoing rebuilding process of urban water systems in Puerto Rico after hurricanes Irma and Maria. The San Juan Bay Estuary encompasses more than 15 miles of shoreline and waterways, including the San Juan Bay, five lagoons, several rivers and creeks, and a network of channels interconnecting these bodies of water. A healthy urban estuary uses nature to support human life, biodiversity, water filtration and flood protection. The course aims to use the J-term classroom space as a platform to analyze change along watercourses from Pre-Columbian era (pre 1493) conditions of productive estuary (with abundant marine life) to urban expansion, fragmentation, and degradation (1940s – current), to hurricane Maria destruction conditions and to projections of sea level rise. The analyses will help inform the design strategies that should be considered in the rebuilding and climate adaptation process. The research component of the course will include finding sources for a designated watercourse in the estuary to describe it geographically, as well as to identify its main transformational forces through history. The hands-on training component consists of using mapping tools such as Google Earth Engine Time Machine Editor to create a time-lapse sequence, and design thinking to explore drawing nature-based strategies for shorelines and watercourses that can support a healthy urban estuary. Sufficient resources will be provided such as historical maps, data, images, and documents. Participants are encouraged to contribute to the understanding of changes in surfaces (water and urban development), and land-water-human linkages of the estuary, as well as explore design strategies for rebuilding with nature. The course proposes to develop the following objectives: 1) Become familiar with the context of San Juan Bay Estuary and the Google Earth Engine tool; 2) Observe a watercourse by making a time-lapse imagery sequence enriched with the history of the watercourse from Pre-Columbian conditions, to hurricane Maria aftermath and climate change projections; 3) Present findings and trends for a watercourse and its surrounding urban area; 4) Explore resilient design strategies for a healthy urban estuary.

Date Mon, Jan 14 Tues, Jan 15 Wed, Jan 16 Thur, Jan 17
Time 9am  – 12:30pm 9am  – 12:30pm 9am  – 12:30pm 9am  – 12:30pm

Prerequisites: Laptops required. Preferred skills but not required – Spanish, Mapping, 2D drawing, 3D modeling.
Cost/Materials: Printing expenses, estimated at $16 per student (8 24” x 36” boards @$4/each)

Enrollment Link