Introduction to Data Science for Building Performance Simulation and Architectural Design, Jung Min Han

Personal Branding for Creative Professionals & Design Entrepreneurs, Diego Olguín

Apocalypse Now, Sophie Weston Chien

Design Your Future, Adam Royalty

Intermediate use of Ladybug, Honeybee, and Butterfly for green building design, Sunghwan Lim

How to Paint Your Dragon, T.K. Justin Ng

Academic Reading and Notetaking Strategies, Alison Pasinella and Nicole Santiago

Why are they wearing? A studio course in costume design for the performing arts, Stacey Berman

Dynamic Mutations GSD V6.0, Nicolas Turchi, Yuan Mu, and Niccolò Dambrosio

Chamber Music, Leon Fong and Charlotte Day

Unitized Curtain Wall Systems, Royce Perez

Exquisite Corpse 2.0 – Machine Learning Applications in Architectural Design, Dongyun Kim and George Guida

Courses are added and updated on a daily basis.


Introduction to Data Science for Building Performance Simulation and Architectural Design

Instructors: Jung Min Han, DDes ‘22
Zoom Link:  TBA
Max Enrollment: 35

The modeling of energy-efficient buildings and sustainable urban development is an increasing concern in both the building design and sustainability consulting industries. Early adoption of building performance simulation software for decision-making during the design phase is essential to achieving sustainable design goals. Guiding designers to pursue sustainability in their built environments will bring favorable outcomes and low-cost adaptations. Machine learning (ML) and data science are promising approaches to shaping the design process and offer instantaneous performance feedback. The active use of data science techniques increases the efficiency and accuracy of building simulation workflow and the optimization of building geometry.

This class will leverage data science and performance simulation as the primary drivers in determining design decisions. In the last decade, the fundamentals of building performance simulation tools for energy, daylighting, airflow, and renewable energies have been translated into performance simulation tools and metrics with relevant measures. There are great advantages for students learning to use such tools, including the ability to calculate metrics and apply related methodologies in their building designs. However, such utilization requires a high level of understanding of the computations necessary for the geometric modeling process, as well as relevant programming skills. These programming skills and analysis techniques will be explained in this class with practical hands-on workshops to impart environmental information and predict building performance in response to design changes. This course will also introduce data management skills such as Python scripting, ML, and data visualization for advanced research.

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am

Prerequisites: Students are encouraged to consider the course’s time limitations and prepare in advance. This will ensure access to the full benefits of this course. Reviewing a Python tutorial and obtaining a general understanding of its basic operations is highly recommended for those unfamiliar with Python. However, students without prior experience in Python or other programming languages will still be able to follow along and participate in the introductory workshops.

Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Personal Branding for Creative Professionals & Design Entrepreneurs

Instructors: Diego Olguín, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

Students will learn about the basic concepts in branding design and building a brand for their own practice as independent designers or entrepreneurs.

During the first week, students will walk through the basic concepts, skills, and language they need to know to develop their brand. In the second week, they will work on their own brand, utilizing the creative process presented over the first week. Students will come out of this course with a personal brand + a guide on how to keep expanding it.

Deliverables of the course: creative concept statement, graphic pathways, a logotype (plus one or two variations), color palette selection, typography selection.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 9-11 a.m. 9-10 a.m. 9-10 a.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 9-11 a.m. 9-11 a.m. 9-12 a.m.

Prerequisites: Required knowledge of basic Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop. Rhino (optional).

Cost/Materials: Sketchbook and sketching tools (analog or digital)

Enrollment Link


Apocalypse Now

Instructors: Sophie Weston Chien, MLA I AP ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 20

Shallow and short tutorials on things you should know for the impending apocalypse. The course includes a close reading of Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, where we will consider the role of community building in traumatic times. Workshops on self-sufficient skills will also be presented daily (skills include storytelling, weaving, conflict resolution, sewing, wilderness first-aid, foraging, understanding natural systems, edible plant identification). All participants will have the opportunity to develop and teach their own skills during the class. At the end of the course, students will prepare a field guide with tutorials and ideas for the future.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $20/Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

Enrollment Link


Design Your Future

Instructors: Adam Royalty, DDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 35

The future can feel uncertain. It is not even clear how the next few months will unfold. How does this uncertainty affect your time at Harvard? How does it impact your plans post-Harvard? Design Your Future is a two-session course where participants learn to apply Human-centered Design to navigate tough decisions in their careers and life. These tools are also useful for leading teams through uncertainty in academic and professional settings.​

During the first session, students will critically examine their personal history before mapping future courses of action.

During the second session, students will confront internal and external barriers that prevent people from moving forward.

Date: Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Intermediate use of Ladybug, Honeybee, and Butterfly for green building design

Instructor: Sunghwan Lim, Ph.D. ‘26
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 50

In this course, we will learn how to utilize Grasshopper plugins Ladybug, Honeybee, and Butterfly for green building design. The instructor will guide from the installation of the software, core techniques, and to advanced level of simulations, those will support your design targeting for energy-efficient and low-carbon building.

About the software:

Unlike conventional simulation methods those you must make a separate geometry for each building simulation, the plugins read your Rhino models directly and perform simulations. Also, design enhancements you make in your Rhino model are simultaneously recognized in the plugins and assess the improvements.

Ladybug allows to analyze weather data and visualize the results from simulations including solar radiation analysis for PV panel design, view analysis for window design. Honeybee performs daylight simulation and energy simulation supported by validated simulation engines, including Radiance and EnergyPlus. Butterfly performs CFD simulation which supports design decisions in a naturally ventilated building. You can find more about the plugins at this link (https://www.food4rhino.com/en/app/ladybug-tools).

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisites: Device with Rhino 7 installed. Basic understanding in Rhino and Grasshopper.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


­­­­­­­How to Paint Your Dragon

Instructors: T.K. Justin Ng, M. Arch I ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 16

Are you tired of straining your eyes and mind on Illustrator and Photoshop? Rediscover your passion for analogue representation by drawing and watercolor painting this winter break.

Over six workshops, this course will explore a myriad of techniques necessary to unleash your creativity on paper. Not only will we cover how to mix colors and control washes, but the course will also examine the effects of different papers, paints and brushes on your paintings. We will play with watercolor’s unpredictable nature to create a sense of depth and texture. The first week will cover foundational techniques that leave you at ease with the medium. For the second week, students are encouraged to tackle subject matters based on their interests: landscapes, buildings, dragons…

The class will meet on Monday, Tuesday and Friday afternoons. At the final class, students will present 2-3 of their watercolor paintings. No prior experience in watercolor is necessary.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan.12, Wed Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $20, excluding paint

Enrollment Link


Academic Reading and Notetaking Strategies

Instructors: Alison Pasinella, Frances Loeb Library Assistant and Nicole Santiago, Frances Loeb Librarian
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 16

As a student at the GSD, you will need to perform independent research and complete lengthy reading assignments for your classes. In this course, you'll learn how to do so efficiently to maximize retention. You will learn to apply strategies for skimming, scanning, and underlining to situations where time is limited and readings are extensive. Coursework will also include peer work and hands-on practice creating paraphrases, summaries, and outlines of challenging texts using techniques you can apply to future assignments and research. The course will be led by professional staff from GSD Writing Services. Class will meet for an hour on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 1:30-2:30pm.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Prerequisites:  N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Why are they wearing? A studio course in costume design for the performing arts

Instructor: Stacey Berman, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

Over the course of 3 sessions, we will explore the role of costume in a constructed environment. Organized as a studio, we will each respond to selected source materials (i.e. texts/scripts/poems/choreography, score) and then discuss our work via group critique. Our process will take us from research through rendering, with the possibility of a guided build/garment creation contingent on independent interest. We will cover both practical skills such as “breaking down” a script, methods of research and forms of presentation as well as conceptual pathways such as materiality, color, silhouette and narrative.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues
Time: 1 – 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: Texts/scripts, provided by the instructor, to read in advance of the first meeting
Cost/Materials: Can be completed entirely with internet/libraries and the Adobe Suite. Optional use of other/non-digital artistic media at students' own expense.

Enrollment Link


Dynamic Mutations GSD V6.0

Instructors: Nicolas Turchi, M. Arch II ’18; Yuan Mu, MDes ’18; and Niccolò Dambrosio, M. Arch II ’17
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: N/A

This two-day workshop will introduce a set of studies through a dynamic workflow between Autodesk Maya and McNeel Rhino+Grasshopper. It intends to approach software on displaying the unique connections between its key features. It will explore the foundation of polygon modeling and utilize UV mapping to create relations between geometry and its topology. Moving forward to expand the workflow on time-based effects, it will take a step back and generate curves or topographical lines through shared features with the geometry. Using those curves as guidelines, students will get familiar with the essential interface, gain experience in the combination of manual sculpting and physical simulation, create computational modeling and effects with certain degrees of freedom. Along with learning procedural design, students will be encouraged to re-evaluate the connection between different techniques and break the boundaries of the conventional thinking around said tools.

What You Will Learn

  • Introduction to Maya and Grasshopper user interfaces
  • Mesh subdivision polygonal modeling
  • Duplication and animated mirror cut
  • UV mapping and edit
  • 2d-3d curve extraction and mapping
  • Parametric modeling/simulation with linked curve drivers
  • Sculpting, deformation, and mesh manipulation
  • Rendering with Arnold in Maya

Requirements

  • Autodesk Maya 2018 or above
  • McNeel Rhinoceros 7 + Grasshopper
  • Grasshopper Plugins: Pufferfish, Weaverbird, Mesh+, Kangaroo
Date: Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Chamber Music

Instructors: Leon Fong, M. Arch I ’24 and Charlotte Day, M. Arch I ’24
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

Chamber music takes its name from the room in which it is produced. In some ways, this chamber is the real instrument, host to a multitude of smaller chambers (violins, cellos, gravicembalos […]), magnifying their vibrations into a description of itself. 

In this virtual one-week workshop, each participant will create a musical instrument/sound-chamber from materials found in nature. The chambers will be without scale, and may be read as instruments or architecture. We will ask participants to invent gestures, both of crafting the chambers and of performing them, so that they produce music apt to the environments of their making. Throughout the exercise, we will gather attitudes to place, performance, and the acoustic properties of material. The culmination of the workshop will be a short film that bears witness to the sounds and images sampled in this collective effort.

Things we will think about:

  • The history of instruments, ornament, things made precious
  • Resonant space, sounds of spaces, sounds of places
  • Scalelessness, ambivalent readings, boxes in boxes in boxes
  • Performance, tuning things, lifting things, preparation

Things we will make:

  • A chamber
  • A sound recording
  • A video (whose relation to chamber and sound recording may be oblique/associative)
Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link 


Unitized Curtain Wall Systems/h2>

Instructors: Royce Perez, M. Arch I ‘17
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

As designers we are confronted with the facade on a regular basis. As we progress throughout our career the term “facade” takes on many technical meanings along with specific curtainwall types. This course aims at providing a general understanding of the unitized system, a subset of curtain wall assemblies. Unitized curtain walls are typical in the architecture industry.

As an architect and facade consultant with a design and technical background, the course is a balanced approach of not being overly technical but not devoid of real-world considerations. We must go beyond designing surfaces to the understanding of how building envelopes are designed, fabricated, and installed on site. This understanding is meant for you to enter practice and engage with informed design and material decisions. Beyond the understanding of the functional aspects of unitized curtain walls, we will focus on the materials used within this system; this includes glass, aluminum, stone, terracotta, glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), and their many possible attachments.

The application of understanding will be through the production of “roadmap” drawings, which include plan, section, and elevation with key details called out; a typical method in practice. The basis for design may either be the student’s design produced in the course or a case study from a list provided. Additionally, axonometrics of facade fragments are encouraged to provide further understanding the design intent. Typical plan and section details will be developed with review from the instructor. Examples will be provided along with a Rhino template with curtain wall geometry.

The first two classes are introductions into technical concepts and materials used in unitized curtain walls. The third and fourth classes will be based on specific questions students may have about their designs in progress and additional unitized curtain wall topics. The last two classes will be students presenting their facade designs to the class.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Prerequisites: Experience with Rhino and Illustrator is beneficial. Vray is a plus but not required.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Exquisite Corpse 2.0 – Machine Learning Applications in Architectural Design

Instructor: Dongyun Kim, MDes ’22 and George Guida, MArch II ’22 (currently MDes)
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 15

The exquisite corpse was a game routinely used by Surrealists to “disrupt the waking mind’s penchant for order”. It hinged on free play and generated unexpected results “unimaginable by one brain alone”. We seek to continue this game today through the lens of machine learning algorithms paired with our collective agency as designers.

This incremental 4-day workshop will introduce the applications of machine learning to architectural design. The game will begin with an understanding of the benefits and limitations of this technology including bias, intelligence, and creativity. This will then be followed by a series of hands-on workshops covering 2D Style Transfer to 3D object manipulation, in which each student will develop an individual or group design project.

This course will be divided into three parts: Dataset collection, GAN Training, and 3D object manipulations. Dataset collection will equip students with an understanding of the emerging agency of designers and the implicit bias ingrained within these. The training of state-of-the-art machine learning models and their manipulation into new 3D forms will be used to challenge an emerging homogeneity in architectural design. These will additionally shed light on the emerging role of the designer and how images can be synthesized into 3D ‘exquisite corpses’.

The tangible skills offered in this workshop will cover the scraping of online datasets, using Python with libraries such as BeautifulSoup, the training of GAN (Generative Adversarial Network) models such as Style Transfer and StyleGAN, and their manipulation through grasshopper workflows. Students can openly extend project topics across architectural, landscape, and urban design interests.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 9 a.m. – 1p.m. 9 a.m. – 1p.m. 19 a.m. – 1p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon
Time: 9 a.m. – 1p.m.
  • Office hours: Jan 4 and 6 from 9-10 a.m.

Prerequisites: Experience with Python, Rhinoceros, and Grasshopper is a plus, but not necessary.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link

 

 

 

 

To view other J-Term opportunities, please visit: www.gsd.harvard.edu/otherjterm/