The information on this page covers a wide variety of student policies. It is the expectation of the GSD that all students, whether or not they are on campus or are currently enrolled as degree candidates, will behave in a mature and responsible manner. This expectation for mature and responsible conduct also encompasses accountability for one’s own well-being, including responsible decision-making regarding physical and mental health. Further, the GSD expects every student to be familiar with the regulations governing membership in the Harvard community, set forth in the GSD Policies. Because students are expected to show good judgment and use common sense at all times, not all kinds of misconduct or behavioral standards are codified here.

Policy on Personal Conduct

Academic Conduct Policy

Leave of Absence (Involuntary)

Degree Requirements Policies

Studio Culture Policy

Information Technology Policies

Student Mail Policy

Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990

Consumer Information

No-Smoking Policy

Drugs and Alcohol

Hazing

Dangerous Weapons and Threats

Missing Persons Policy

International Travel

General Policy on Information Technology

Electronic Media Policy

Video and Audio Recording of Classroom Activities by Students

Computer Accounts

Copyrighted Materials on the Internet

Falsification of Admission Application

Ownership of Student Work, Intellectual Property Rights and Copyright

Student Inventions and Software Creations

Right of the University to Capture and use Digital Images

Use of University Libraries

Trademarks and “Use-of-Name” Policies

 


 

Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990
In compliance with the Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act of 1990, the Harvard University Police Department publishes an online annual security handbook, entitled ‘Playing It Safe'. The handbook describes Harvard's security policies, provides statistical information on the occurrence of crime on campus, and outlines some of the counseling programs the university offers. The handbook can be found at https://www.hupd.harvard.edu/files/hupd/files/hupd_16_asr_102616.pdf.

Consumer Information
In addition to the information contained in Student Policies, additional consumer information can be found on the Financial Aid Consumer Information page.

No-Smoking Policy
The no-smoking ordinance of Cambridge, Massachusetts, defines smoking as a hazard to public health and a public nuisance. It prohibits smoking in any public spaces in Cambridge, including classrooms, lecture halls, libraries, auditoriums, restrooms, work areas, lounges, and hallways. These regulations are in effect throughout the city, and, of course, throughout Harvard University and the GSD. All faculty, students and staff members are expected to comply fully with this no-smoking ordinance. Smoking is not permitted anywhere at the GSD. Under terms of the Cambridge ordinance, the GSD is responsible for policing all no-smoking areas within its buildings. Persons who smoke in no-smoking areas are in violation of this ordinance, which provides substantial individual and institutional penalties. Please advise all persons who are smoking inside GSD buildings of the regulations and request that they comply. If the smoker does not comply with the request, the affected person should give the smoker's name to the Dean of Students.

Drugs and Alcohol
Harvard University promotes the health and well-being of its students and employees through its Health Services and other agencies. The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on Harvard property or as a part of any Harvard activities is a violation of university rules as well as of the law. Possession, use, or distribution of certain non-prescription drugs, including marijuana, amphetamines, heroin, cocaine, and nonprescription synthetics; procurement or distribution of alcohol if one is under 21 years of age; and provision of alcohol to anyone under 21 years of age are violations of law and of Harvard policy.  Although Massachusetts law now permits adults aged 21 or older to possess and consume marijuana under certain circumstances, federal law prohibits the possession, use, or distribution of marijuana, including for medical purposes, on Harvard property or as part of a Harvard activity.  Thus, even if possession of use of marijuana would be permitted under Massachusetts law, it remains prohibited on campus.

The university holds its students and employees responsible for the consequences of their decisions to use or distribute illicit drugs or to serve or consume alcohol. Further, it expects students and employees to create and maintain an environment for learning and work that is safe and healthy and that encourages responsible conduct. The use of illicit drugs and the misuse of alcohol are potentially harmful to health. In particular, synthetically produced drugs, which are readily available in the Boston metropolitan area, often have unpredictable emotional and physical side effects that constitute an extreme health hazard. In addition, students are encouraged to weigh the seriousness of potential loss of function that may come from ingesting illicit drugs or too much alcohol. Because of the considerable health hazards involved in drug use, administrative, medical, and psychiatric help for students having drug problems or difficulties controlling their use of alcohol are available on a confidential basis at the University Health Services. Any member of the university may make use of the Health Services on an emergency basis, day or night. Attention is directed to the fact that the university is not, and cannot be considered as, a protector or sanctuary from the existing laws of the city, state, or federal government. Students are reminded that there are heavy penalties, including imprisonment, for possession or distribution of illicit drugs and for selling or delivering alcohol to, or procuring alcohol for, someone under the age of 21. Additionally, the misuse of prescription drugs (sharing, buying, or using in a manner different than that prescribed) is a violation of University policy.

There are also serious penalties for anyone under the age of 21 who purchases, attempts to purchase, arranges to procure alcoholic beverages, misrepresents his or her age, or falsifies his or her identification with the intent of purchasing alcohol; anyone, regardless of age, caught falsifying a driver's license, or selling or distributing false ID's; and anyone, regardless of age, who operates a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or with an open container of alcohol. In addition, the City of Cambridge prohibits consumption of alcohol on public property or on property open to the public. All students should become familiar with the publication. ‘Playing it Safe' prepared by the Harvard Police. Download Playing It Safe here.

GSD Policy on Hazing
Students are advised that Massachusetts law expressly prohibits any form of hazing in connection with the initiation of students into student groups and organizations. The relevant statutes are provided below.  The law applies to both officially recognized and unrecognized student groups and to practices conducted on and off campus.

Using the definition of hazing set forth in the Massachusetts hazing statute, the Dean of Students will consider all reports of hazing in the normal course of its oversight, taking disciplinary action in appropriate cases, and will report confirmed incidents to appropriate law enforcement officials.

Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 269

Section 17. Whoever is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of hazing, as defined herein, shall be punished by a fine of not more than three thousand dollars or by imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than one year, or both such fine and imprisonment.

The term “hazing” as used in this section and in sections eighteen and nineteen, shall mean any conduct or method of initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct shall include whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug, or other substance, or any other brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to affect adversely the physical health or safety or any such student or other person, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation.

Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section to the contrary, consent shall not be available as a defense to any prosecution under this action.

Section 18. Whoever knows that another person is the victim of hazing as defined in section seventeen and is at the scene of such crime shall, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, report such crime to an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practicable. Whoever fails to report such crime shall be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars.

Section 19. Each institution of secondary education and each public and private institution of post- secondary education shall issue to every student group, student team, or student organization which is part of such institution or is recognized by the institution or permitted by the institution to use its name or facilities or is known by the institution to exist as an unaffiliated student group, student team or student organization, a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen; provided, however, that an institution’s compliance with this section’s requirements that an institution issue copies of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen to unaffiliated student groups, teams or organizations shall not constitute evidence of the institution’s recognition or endorsement of said unaffiliated student groups, teams or organizations.

Each such group, team, or organization shall distribute a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen to each of its members, plebes, pledges or applicants for membership. It shall be the duty of each such group, team or organization, acting through its designated officer, to deliver annually to the institution an attested acknowledgment stating that such group, team, or organization has received a copy of this section and said sections seventeen and eighteen, that each of its members, plebes, pledges, or applicants has received a copy of sections seventeen and eighteen, and that such group, team, or organization understands and agrees to comply with the provision of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen.

Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of post-secondary education shall, at least annually, before or at the start of enrollment, deliver to each person who enrolls as a full-time student in such institution a copy of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen.

Each institution of secondary education and each public or private institution of post-secondary education shall file, at least annually, a report with the board of higher education and in the case of secondary institutions, the board of education, certifying that such institution has complied with its responsibility to inform student groups, teams or organizations and to notify each full-time student enrolled by it of the provisions of this section and sections seventeen and eighteen, and also certifying that said institution has adopted a disciplinary policy with regard to the organizers and participants of hazing, and that such policy has been set forth with appropriate emphasis in the student handbook or similar means of communicating the institution’s policies to its students. The board of higher education and, in the case of secondary institutions, the board of education, shall promulgate regulations governing the content and frequency of such reports, and shall forthwith report to the attorney general any such institution which fails to make such report.

For more detailed information, refer to Playing it Safe.

Dangerous Weapons and Threats

Threats Involving Deadly Weapons, Explosives, Bombs, Chemical or Biological Agents, or Other Deadly Devices or Substance

The following provision of Massachusetts law concerning certain kinds of threats underscores why such behavior must be treated by the GSD as an actionable offense:

Whoever willfully communicates or causes to be communicated, either directly or indirectly, orally, in writing, by mail, by use of a telephone or telecommunication device including, but not limited to, electronic mail, Internet communications and facsimile communications, through an electronic communication device or by any other means, a threat: (1) that a firearm, rifle, shotgun, machine gun or assault weapon, as defined in section 121 of chapter 140, an explosive or incendiary device, a dangerous chemical or biological agent, a poison, a harmful radioactive substance or any other device, substance or item capable of causing death, serious bodily injury or substantial property damage, will be used at a place or location, or is present or will be present at a place or location, whether or not the same is in fact used or present; or (2) to hijack an aircraft, ship, or common carrier thereby causing anxiety, unrest, fear, or personal discomfort to any person or group of persons shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 20 years or imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 21/2 years, or by fine of not more than $10,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Whoever willfully communicates or causes to be communicated such a threat thereby causing either the evacuation or serious disruption of a school, school related event, school transportation, or a dwelling, building, place of assembly, facility or public transport, or an aircraft, ship or common carrier, or willfully communicates or causes serious public inconvenience or alarm, shall be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not less than 3 years nor more than 20 years or imprisonment in the house of correction for not less than 6 months nor more than 21/2 years, or by fine of not less than $1,000 nor more than $50,000, or by both such fine and imprisonment.  Massachusetts General Laws, c.269§ 14(b)-(c).

Firearms, Explosives, Combustible Fuels, Firecrackers, and Dangerous Weapons

Possession and/or use on University property of firearms or other dangerous weapons (as defined below) or ammunition, explosives, combustible fuels, fire-crackers, and potential ingredients thereof is forbidden by University policy.  The applicable Massachusetts law is as follows:

For the purpose of this paragraph “firearm” shall mean any pistol, revolver, rifle or smoothbore arm from which a shot, bullet or pellet can be discharged.

Whoever, not being a law enforcement officer, and notwithstanding any license obtained by the person pursuant to chapter 140, carries on the person a firearm, loaded or unloaded, or other dangerous weapon in any building or on the grounds of any elementary or secondary school, college or university without the written authorization of the board or officer in charge of such elementary or secondary school, college or university shall be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment for not more than 2 years or both. A law enforcement officer may arrest without a warrant and detain a person found carrying a firearm in violation of this paragraph.

Any officer in charge of an elementary or secondary school, college or university, or any faculty member or administrative officer of an elementary or secondary school, college or university that fails to report violations of this paragraph shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and punished by a fine of not more than $500.  Massachusetts General Laws, c.269§ 10(j).

Under Massachusetts law, the definition of dangerous weapons includes many items designed to do bodily injury:

. . . any stiletto, dagger or a device or case which enables a knife with a locking blade to be drawn at a locked position, any ballistic knife, or any knife with a detachable blade capable of being propelled by any mechanism, dirk knife, any knife having a double-edged blade, or a switch knife, or any knife having an automatic spring release device by which the blade is released from the handle, having a blade of over one and one-half inches, or a slung shot, blowgun, blackjack, metallic knuckles or knuckles of any substance which could be put to the same use with the same or similar effect as metallic knuckles, nunchaku, zoobow, also known as klackers or kung fu sticks, or any similar weapon consisting of two sticks of wood, plastic or metal connected at one end by a length of rope, chain, wire or leather, a shuriken or any similar pointed starlike object intended to injure a person when thrown, or any armband, made with leather which has metallic spikes, points or studs or any similar device made from any other substance or a cestus or similar material weighted with metal or other substance and worn on the hand, or a Manriki-Gusari or similar length of chain having weighted ends . . . .  Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 10(b).

In addition, students should recognize that even when they are away from the University, Massachusetts law requires a permit or firearms identification card or compliance with other specialized rules (depending upon the type of weapon) for possession of any firearms. Carrying any firearm (even if unloaded) in violation of the law is punishable by imprisonment with a mandatory minimum sentence of eighteen months, which cannot be suspended or reduced.  Massachusetts General Laws, c. 269 § 10(a).

Students should consult the local police department in the city or town in which they reside if they intend to possess firearms on non-University property, in order to assure strict compliance with the applicable statutes.

Missing Persons Policy

As required under federal law, the GSD immediately will refer to the Harvard University Police Department (“HUPD”) any missing persons report involving a student who lives in on-campus housing.  If any member of the Harvard community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is missing, he or she should immediately notify HUPD at 617.495.1212. If HUPD determines that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours, then within the 24 hours following this determination, the School or HUPD, will: (1) notify an appropriate external law enforcement agency, unless the local law enforcement agency was the entity that made the determination that the student is missing; (2) contact anyone the student has identified as a missing person contact under the procedures described below; and (3) notify others at the University, as appropriate, about the student’s disappearance.

In addition to identifying a general emergency contact person, students residing in on-campus housing have the option to identify confidentially a separate person to be contacted by Harvard in the event that the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours.  Students are not required to designate a separate individual for this purpose and if they choose not to do so, then Harvard will assume that they have chosen to treat their general emergency contact as their missing person contact.

Students who wish to identify a confidential missing person should notify the Registrar.  A student’s confidential missing person contact will be accessible only by authorized campus officials and by law enforcement in the course of an investigation, and may not be disclosed outside of a missing person investigation.  In addition, if it has been determined that a student who is under 18 years of age and not emancipated has been missing for more than 24 hours, then the GSD or HUPD will contact that student’s custodial parent or guardian, in addition to contacting any additional contact person designated by the student.

Students are reminded that they must provide the Registrar with emergency contact information and/or confidential missing persons information if they have not already done so

International Travel
All students traveling abroad are required to register with the Harvard Travel Registry for trips funded or arranged by Harvard or for which they will receive Harvard credit. It has been created so the University can locate you quickly and provide assistance in the unlikely event of an emergency. This procedure is also strongly recommended for all faculty and staff. Be sure to update your itinerary and contact information if they change during the course of your trip.

Before traveling abroad, you need to complete the following steps at www.traveltools.harvard.edu:

  • Register your itinerary in the Harvard Travel Registry.  Registering is required for students traveling with any type of Harvard sponsorship, and is strongly recommended for all other travelers.
  • Learn about Harvard Travel Assist and keep a copy of the phone number with you: +1 617-998-0000
  • Review country-specific emergency and safety information
  • Review visa requirements and get application assistance

Harvard Travel Assist services are offered to eligible Harvard travelers and include medical referrals, emergency evacuations and repatriation, as well as access to country-specific safety and medical information.  They are available 24/7 for emergencies and general medical and security advice. Read the full Policy on International Travel.

General Policy on Information Technology
Access to the GSD’s networks, applications, computers and other electronic resources is a privilege, which the GSD reserves the right to revoke at any time at its sole discretion. Your access is contingent upon your continued proper use of these resources and your continued adherence to applicable law, this policy, and other GSD and Harvard University policies. For detailed information on the GSD’s Computer Resource Policies, see the IT Policies resource page.

Electronic Media Policy
Electronic media, such as social networking sites, blogs, and virtual worlds, have become increasingly prominent in daily life. Used effectively, they can be powerful communication tools, enabling individuals to share and exchange views on topics of mutual interest. To ensure that all students are comfortable engaging fully in the learning experience while at the GSD, we ask all members of the GSD community to be respectful, honest, have integrity and personal accountability when using these forms of communications.

Video and Audio Recording of Classroom Activities by Students
GSD students are not permitted to make audio or video recordings of classroom sessions or activities in any form without the express approval of the faculty member(s) conducting the session, the student participants, and the Registrar’s Office. The use of the term ‘recording’ in this policy refers to any images or audio captured by digital or film-based cameras, cellular telephones, hand-held devices, PDAs, pagers, audio tape recorders, or other digital or film-based device.

Computer Accounts
All registered GSD students and affiliates, and external cross-enrolled students, may receive an account on the GSD’s computer local area network, with a unique identifier (username) and password. The account is normally valid until approximately one month following graduation or withdrawal, or the end of semester enrolled for cross-registered students. Use of the GSD’s computer resources—including hardware, software, data, email, and internet access, and other resources—is intended for support of personal GSD-related academic studies. Commercial, for-profit, or other non-academic use is inappropriate. Use of the account username and password constitutes implicit acceptance of, and is contingent upon, the rules and regulations of the Computer Resources Group as outlined on the web pages at gsd.harvard.edu/resources/it-policies/. Any use or activity which threatens the security or performance of the GSD computer network, invades the privacy of or harasses any other community member, or violates any rules of the GSD Computer Resources Group, may be grounds for termination of account privileges or other disciplinary action. Account usernames and passwords are assigned to individual students and are not transferable. A student may not allow any other person to use his or her computer account or password for any purpose, nor may any student use or attempt to use any other student’s account or password; doing so may be grounds for termination of account privileges or other disciplinary action. Every student is responsible for his or her computer account and the circumstances of its use or misuse, including monetary charges for services or supplies consumed. Any student who believes his or her computer account or password has been compromised or misused should immediately contact the Director of Computer Resources.

Copyrighted Materials on the Internet
All GSD users must respect the copyrights in works that are accessible through computers connected to the Harvard network. Federal copyright law prohibits the reproduction, distribution, public display or public performance of copyrighted materials without permission of the copyright owner, unless fair use or another exemption under copyright law exists. In appropriate circumstances, the GSD will terminate the network access of users who are found to have repeatedly infringed the copyrights of others. Information about the application of copyright law to peer-to-peer file sharing of music, movies and other copyrighted works is available at www.dmca.harvard.edu. Students with questions about copyright law or this policy should contact the Director of Computer Resources.

Falsification of Admission Application
Occasionally, a candidate for admission may make inaccurate or incomplete statements or submit false materials in connection with their applications. In most cases, these misrepresentations or omissions are discovered during the admission process and the applicant is rejected. If a misrepresentation or omission is discovered after a candidate is admitted, the offer of admission normally will be withdrawn. If a misrepresentation or omission is discovered after a student has registered, or registered and completed courses, the offer of admission ordinarily will be rescinded, the course credit and grades will be revoked, and the student will be required to leave the GSD. If discovery occurs after a degree has been awarded, the offer of admission ordinarily will be rescinded, and the course credit, grades, and degree will be revoked. The determination that an application is inaccurate or contains misrepresentations rests solely with the Office of Admissions and will be resolved outside the student disciplinary process.

Ownership of Student Work, Intellectual Property Rights and Copyright
Except as provided below, students retain the copyright and other intellectual property rights in work they create in their capacity as students at the GSD. If the work is created as part of the student’s duties as a paid employee (whether by stipend or by salary) it will be considered a ‘work made for hire’ for the University and the University will own the copyright.

A work is understood as the original expression of an author; a copy of the work is a physical manifestation of the expression. Copies of work submitted by a student in satisfaction of admission, course, or degree requirements, such as papers, drawings, models, digital images and other materials, become the property of the school. The GSD may use such copies for GSD non-commercial, academic or research purposes such as in exhibitions of GSD student work, GSD publications, reports to sponsors of studios and other forms of GSD outreach, provided that each student must be appropriately credited as the creator of the student’s work. Any other use of student work, for example, by faculty in their own publications, requires the written consent of each student contributor, in addition to appropriate credit. The school, faculty, and staff assume no responsibility for the physical safeguarding of such copies of student work and may, at their discretion, retain such copies, return them to their creators, or discard them. Ordinarily, material of a current student will not be discarded without giving the student a chance to reclaim it.

Due to the nature of design instruction, faculty will often be in the position of sharing their creative work with students and involving students in the work. Additionally, students working in groups may create works collaboratively. In such cases, joint ownership of works may result by agreement or as a matter of law.

If the GSD has provided more than incidental support for the creation and development of a work, individual students who contributed to the work will retain the rights to their ideas, but the University will own the copyright and other rights in the work itself. GSD support may include use of GSD resources such as funds, facilities and equipment beyond the resources typically provided for student use in connection with studios and other courses.

If the work is created as part of an activity that is subject to an agreement between the University/GSD and a third party that contains provisions on copyright and the use of the work, rights will be allocated in accordance with the agreement. With respect to studios, it is general GSD policy not to enter into or approve agreements with sponsors of studios that directly or indirectly provide for the transfer of rights in student work to a sponsor, beyond allowing use of the work as is customary in reports to the sponsor and displays relating to the project. In no circumstances will a transfer of rights, other than in connection with such customary uses, be approved without the written consent of each student contributor.

The University’s ‘Intellectual Property Policy’ can be found at: www.techtransfer.harvard.edu/resources/policies/IP/

Student Inventions and Software Creations
The University Statement of Policy in Regard to Inventions, Patents and Copyrights specifies that it applies to ‘all members of the university including students in connection with their university work.’ This will be interpreted to mean the following: In regard to inventions, ownership of inventions made by a student shall remain with the student unless:
1. The invention results from a student’s employment by Harvard (either by stipend or salary).
2. The invention is made in work which is subjected to a sponsored research agreement.
3. The invention is made through the use of significant university resources or facilities (the use of resource or facilities generally available to students as part of their educational activities would not be considered ‘significant’ in this context). In regard to software, ownership of software created by a student shall remain with the student unless:
1. The software is created as part of the student’s duties as a paid employee (whether paid by stipend or by salary).
2. The software is created in work which is subject to a sponsored research agreement.
3. The software is created as part of work within a program, laboratory, or department which has a specified policy (which has been communicated to the student) that software will be owned by the university.
4. The software is created with the use of significant university resources or facilities (the use of resources or facilities generally available to students as part of their educational activities would not be considered ‘significant’ in this context).

Right of the University to Capture and use Digital Images
The use of digitized images for ID cards for academic and security purposes at the university is a condition of employment for all employees, and a condition of enrollment for all students. The university is within its rights to require images for the purposes of security and academic integrity. Specifically, Harvard University may use digitally recorded images of its populations for identification purposes, including identification cards, security systems, and classroom and exam proctor lists. Requests for exemptions from having a photo ID will be reviewed by the Office of the General Counsel and will be granted only in extreme circumstances. If you do not wish to have your picture in facebooks or internal directories, contact ID Card Services at 617 495 3322.

Should no previous objection be recorded, the university may print images of students, staff, faculty, or administration in its many traditional house/dorm books, class books, or organizational charts for purposes within the university. Should no previous objection be recorded, the university may print images in internal publications of students or faculty who are receiving degrees or awards. Should permission be given, the university may distribute prints of all students and faculty receiving degrees or awards outside of the university. Images will not be distributed from this database for purposes of negative publicity that could endanger a member of our community.

Use of University Libraries
The university’s libraries are for the use of the students, faculty, staff, and other authorized members of the university and scholarly community. Except when specifically authorized for use to a designated commercial user, the systematic exploitation of library resources, including its databases, for profit is prohibited. It is inappropriate for students and others to sell data, to act as agents for those who do so, or otherwise to use their library privileges other than for personal academic use. Students who fail to comply with library rules will be subject to revocation of library privileges, disciplinary action, and legal prosecution. In particular, unauthorized removal from the library of any book or other library material or property, or destruction, defacement or abuse of any library materials or other resources, are matters of grave concern. All library users will be subject to the fines and penalties of the Graduate School of Design and of the university as well as the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts governing crimes against property.

Trademarks and “Use-of-Name” Policies
Harvard University’s Trademark Program is responsible for protecting and licensing Harvard’s various trademarks (e.g., “Harvard,” “Harvard College,” “Harvard Law School,” “the VERITAS shield,” etc.) worldwide. After covering operational expenses, revenue from the Trademark Program’s licensing activities is provided to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences in support of that faculty’s undergraduate financial aid initiatives. Any student group wishing to reproduce any University trademark on products (e.g., t-shirts, mugs, etc.) should contact the Trademark Program in advance: the Trademark Program will provide guidance on how the marks may be used, can recommend licensed manufacturers, and advise when royalty exemptions apply. All student group names, logos, or names of student group publications incorporating “Harvard” or any other University trademark are owned by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and are used by permission of the University. The Trademark Program is also responsible for dealing with the unauthorized use of Harvard’s trademarks worldwide, provides advice on trademark related issues and assists schools, departments, and units in obtaining trademark protection for any trademarks they are using, whether or not they include the word “Harvard.” In addition, the Trademark Program administers Harvard’s “Use-of-Name” policies, which ensure that the University’s various trademarks (names and insignias) are used appropriately and accurately by members of the Harvard community and in accordance with the principles embodied in the policies. Students or student groups are permitted to use the names and insignias of the University or any of its schools or units only as authorized in the policy on The Use of Harvard Names and Insignias  ( http://trademark.harvard.edu/policy-on-use-of-harvard-names-and-insignias). In particular, references to “Harvard” or “Harvard University,” or suggestions of affiliation with any school or unit of the University in connection with any organization, publication, activity, or third-party is only allowable with advance permission of the Dean and, in certain instances, the Provost.